Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy

A Privacy Policy on a blog???

Yeah, I know...

Stating this, this is my own personal blog. All content on it is either mine, or is used with permission, or if I ever get famous, by guest writers, who also use permission to post things from their respective owners. Being said, let's get on with it: 

Who Am I

My name is Kenton de Jong and I'm a web developer based out of Regina, Saskatchewan. I left my job a web developer in August, 2017 and I started doing this full time since then. My website is https://kentondejong.com/

What Personal Data I Collect And Why I Collect It

Comments

All comments on our website are done via Facebook Comments to help weed out spam, but also to help communicate better with my audience. I don't know about you, but I hate signing to make a comment on a website. Being said, Facebook probably uses the content from your comments to sell you ads. There's nothing I can do about that. Here is their privacy policy.

Cookies

These aren't as tasty as chocolate chip, but they're still useful. I use cookies via Google Analytics to track my users' anonymous data. The data collected includes what pages you view, how long you're on a page for, where in the world you are, what gender you are (if you're logged into your Gmail account), how old you are (if you're logged into your Gmail account), etc. It does not track personal information about you. I use this data to know what kind of content you're enjoying (or not enjoying) and try to convince companies to sponsor me.

Because of my background in web development, I also use cookies in my newsletter/promo popups. That way I don't prompt people who already signed up to sign up again, or repeatedly SD  f bother people who aren't interested. 

Advertising

As of June, 2018 I use my own custom ads on my website. All ads are designed by me, following guidelines provided by the advertiser. They don't add cookies to your browser when you click on them; instead Google Analytics just tracks if you clicked on them. 

Affiliate Program Participation

I can't make this blog work without affiliate ads. Affiliate programs pay me a certain amount depending on what you do after clicking on their ads or links on my site. These ads or links will install a cookie on your browser and if you purchase an item, I make a profit of the sales. All my articles have a disclaimer on top informing you about the links. 

Multimedia From Other Sites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website. These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content. Some of these website include YouTube, Facebook, Google, etc. 

Who I Share Your Data With

Your information may be shared with third parties (eg: advertiser) so that I can try and make some cash money and pay rent. Your personal information is never shared because I don't collect it, unless you explicitly allow me too, such as via a contact form or a newsletter signup. 

The Third-party Service Providers I Currently Use:

Google Analytics: I already talked about this, but GA tracks website usage and traffic, providing helpful information I can then take to advertiser or sponsors. If you ever ever want to see a report, just let me know. You will probably be less than impressed. Hahahahahaha. Here is their privacy policy. 

MailChimp: I use this newsletter service to email my subscribers. After signing up, your name and email address are stored for the sole purpose of delivering such communications. Please read their privacy policy for details. 

Amazon Affiliate Ads: I use this program to sell books or products to my subscribers. After clicking a link or service to their website, a cookie will be installed on your browser for 48 hours. If you purchase anything while that cookie active, I will get a percentage of the profits. You can read their privacy policy for details. 

Stripe: Any purchases through my site are through Stripe, and I do not collect credit card numbers. However, I do collect emails in case I need to contact you about your purchase. Here is their policy too. 

CoinHive: I attempted to use CoinHive to generate small bits of money on users' computers to solve mathematical problems. I used it for about a month and then my users' complained their computers said my website was infected with Malware. I removed CoinHive after than and will not install it again. Here is their privacy policy. 

How Long Do I Keep Data

Facebook stores your information if you leave a comment, Google tracks you while you visit my site and MailChimp collects your email information. All these companies collect this data indefinitely. I keep information from my contact form only so I can email you back. 

What Rights You Have Over Your Data

Beyond the conscientiousness action of signing up for a newsletter or leaving me a comment, all other information I collect is anonymous. If you don't want me to know who you are, just don't talk to me. Haha. If you don't want your anonymous data tracked, then use a browser like Firefox, since you can get Google Chrome tracks your usage. 

Sensitive Personal Information

At no time should you submit sensitive personal information to the website. This includes your social security number, information regarding race or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious beliefs, health information, criminal background, or trade union memberships. If you elect to submit such information to us, it will be subject to this policy. If you post racist comments or crazy theories about the government, I will delete your comment. 

Children's Information

This website does not knowingly collect any personally identifiable information from children under the age of 16. If you think that happened for whatever reason, please contact me at kenton@kentondejong.com.

 

This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on June 27, 2018.

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