Why You Should Move to Canada

Why You Should Move to Canada March 3, 2016 · 12 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

In case you haven't heard, Super Tuesday was last Tuesday and everybody's most disliked presidential candidate, Donald Trump, did very well. He didn't do as well as predicted, but he did well enough that he is now officially taken the lead for the Republican nomination. While the Republicans struggle to find some way of stopping Mr. Trump, many Americans worry about the future of their country. As a result, many Americans have been thinking about moving to Canada.

While similar statements were made when marijuana and gay marriage was legalized, "How to move to Canada" spiked 1000% on Google after last Super Tuesday. In fact, the Nova Scotia tourism website got more traffic in a single day then it did all last year and the Canadian immigration website was having difficulties handling all the traffic, so it seems that a lot of people are wondering if they should move to Canada.

As a Canadian I feel it is my duty to highlight some of the reasons why somebody – particularly an American – should consider moving to Canada.

1. You'll be An Instant Millionaire

You'll be a millionaire

The last few years have some pretty wild swings between the American and Canadian dollar, and right now the Canadian dollar is much lower than the American dollar. If you bring $1,000 American dollars over the border with you when you come to Canada, you'll have just about a million Canadian dollars! It's like a cheat code for your wallet. Imagine this; you've been working overtime shifts for the past thirty years to pay your bills, when you could have just moved across the border and retired!

2. We Have a Large American Community

I know it can be scary traveling to a new country and sometimes the culture shock can be hard for people to take in. Thankfully, Americans have been coming to Canada for centuries. These Americans range from freed African slaves during the 19th Century to smugglers looking for alcohol during Prohibition, able-bodied men during the Vietnam Draft and veterans refusing to participate in the 2003 invasion of Iraq. The past two centuries of Americans coming to Canada have formed a very large community, so there are several programs available to help integrate into society.

3. You Already Come Here for Healthcare

Healthcare in America is expensive. Healthcare in Canada is not. It's much cheaper to get a passport, buy a plane ticket to Canada, rent a hotel, undergo an operation, go to a movie, snack on a poutine, ride a moose and then fly home than it is to sit in the waiting room in America. This is not an exaggeration. Many Americans already come over to our country for healthcare on a daily basis, so why not just stay and make it much easier for you?

Moose is cheaper than healthcare Poutine is cheaper than healthcare

4. There's Way More Space

Canada is at least 17 times bigger than America, and we only have 10% of your population. That means you can have about 170 times more space to yourself than you can back home. Tired of living in a cramped trailer homer? Come buy a farm! Tired of sharing a backyard with snoopy Mr. Feeny or Earl Hindman? Come get a backyard so big that you can't even see the other side!

Ninety percent of Canadians live near the US border, so if you want a little more isolation just drive up north and you'll have all the space you need! Most don't know this, but the northern half of Canada, which is thirty times bigger than England, has just over 100,000 people. Talk about wide open spaces!

Wide Open Spaces in Saskatchewan

5. Nobody Shoots Anybody

Unlike in America, it's really hard to get a gun in Canada. To get a gun you have to undergo rigorous training, you have to meet with several levels of bureaucratic government and then you have to sign a waiver that makes you promise you won't shoot anything with it.  Signing that waiver is the worse part about getting a gun. The moral responsibility one has to put into signing that paper is so severe that most Canadian don't even bother in getting a gun to begin with.

If somebody does happen to get a gun though, they are too scared to shoot anybody with it. If they do shoot somebody, they know they will not only be on the national news for the next two months,  they will somehow get tied into the Duffy scandal and eventually have a really bad actor portray them in a feature length CBC documentary, which is just far too embarrassing!

6. People Will Actually Like You

Tired of being disliked by just about everyone in the world? Over the past few decades the United States have pissed off all 196 countries in the world, including their own. From Columbia to England to Iran to Russia, nobody really likes the United States anymore. It's kind of like being that old football star that hangs around high school who thinks he is still relevant.

Canada, on the other hand, is loved by everybody. People laugh at our silly maple syrup jokes, we play little flag games on disputed islands in the Atlantic, sometimes Russia flies their planes over the Arctic to come say hi, and occasionally we poke our cute little F-18 fighter sticks into war zones to show we are a team player. People love Canada so much that many American tourists wear Canadian clothing so they are treated better.

Don't lie about who you are; just become a Canadian! Your bacon, beer, football and hockey teams will suddenly become so much better!

7. You'll Use a Logical Form of Measurement

There's no logic when it comes to the Imperial Measurement system. Twelve inches make a foot. Three feet make a yard. One thousand seven hundred sixty yards make a mile. That's just plain madness! If I want to know how many inches it takes to make a mile, I have to whip out a scientific calculator and pray to God I got the numbers correct.

Canada uses a much more logical form of measurement. Ten millimeters make a centimeter. A hundred centimeters make a meter. A thousand meters make a kilometer. A base ten measurement is so simple that you can even do it with your fingers. It's so simple, in fact, that a Canadian child can tell you that there are a million millimeters in a kilometer, while an American adult still wouldn't be sure how many inches are in a mile.

Imperial Measurement is Stupid

8. You can rejoin the British Commonwealth

America had a war a little while ago where they left the British Commonwealth. It was pretty messy and a lot of people had a tough time getting used to it and since then things have been pretty rocky. If you want to go back to the glory days, you know, when America was "great", then just move up to Canada and rejoin the Commonwealth. We just had a marriage in the royal family not that long ago and have since had two cute little kids. We also have the face of our living Queen on the back of our coins, not the faces of some dead old guys like you currently do.

Kate and William's Wedding

9. You'll Finally Have an Official Language

I can't imagine how difficult it must be to wake up every morning and not be sure what language you need to speak today. Is it French? Spanish? Mandarin? Russian? Arabic? For some incomprehensible reason, although the United States of America is 240 years old, it has never decided on an official language. It must be so frustrating going your whole life knowing that at any given time the language of your country will change and suddenly you'll have no idea what's going on. No wonder people are always so paranoid down there!

Thankfully, Canada made a decision early on to have two official languages: English and French. If you speak one of those, you'll do great up here.

10. You'll live With Santa

Santa lives in Canada, regardless of what the Finns say. He has his own address which can be mailed to any time of the year, and every Christmas he'll mail the children of Canada a letter. Being so close, Santa saves the best presents for Canadians and visits us way before he visits Americans (minus Alaska). Not only will you get to live in the Land of Christmas Magic, you'll get presents even sooner than before!

11. We Might Have a Nuclear Bomb

Nuclear bomb, anyone?

Sometimes people drop things by accident, and we understand that, and sometimes plane engines catch fire, and we understand that, and sometimes pilots have to jump from said burning plane and hope it crashes in the ocean, and we understand that too. But sometimes that plane recovers and crashes into the mountains and goes missing just long enough the nuclear bomb that happened to be on board to go missing too. Do we know what happened to that missing bomb? I don't know, but let's just hope things stateside don't get too messy and we don't have to find out, okay?

Pin this article to tell your friends how awesome Canada is!

Why You Should Move to Canada

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

Sign up for a list of
100+ Things to do in Regina!

You might also enjoy

Travel Guide to Hong Kong

Imagine the bustling streets of New York, then times it by ten. Add a dash of Chinese culture, a wallop of nature and half dozen fish balls that don’t actually contain any fish, and you have the beautiful city that is Hong Kong.

At 7.2 million people, Hong Kong is a dynamic city with an incredible history, towering skyscrapers and a unique mix of English and Chinese that can’t be found anywhere else in the world. While Hong Kong has existed for a millennium, it was officially founded in 1842 to solidify a truce between Great Britain and the Qing dynasty of China during the First Opium War. A decade after the British took control of Hong Kong, the Black Death swept into China, killing hundreds of thousands of people. It would remain part of Hong Kong’s life for a century.

During World War II, Hong Kong was captured by the Japanese. For three years and eight months the British-Chinese culture of the city was destroyed, replaced with Japanese text, language and art. The booming city of 1.6 million people was slashed to only 600,000. Japanese occupation was incredibly harsh for the Hongkongese, being the darkest part of their history. Japan ceased occupation on August 6th, 1945, in response to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. For forty-two more years, Hong Kong was controlled by the British, with the reunification between Hong Kong and mainland China finally occurring in 1997.

Read More

Five Historic Canadian Cities

This is the second of five articles about trips to take across Canada. I was inspired to do this series after I was disappointed by what Canadian tours G Adventures offered on their website.

Canada's 150th birthday cannot be complete without visiting the country's capital city... but which one should you visit? While Ottawa is the current capital of Canada, there have been four other capital cities, and it has changed seven times. It started in Kingston (1841 – 1844) and then moved to Montréal (1844 – 1849), believing it to be safer from the Americans. After the citizens of Montréal burnt it down, it rotated between Toronto (1849 – 1852 and 1856 – 1858) and Québec City (1852 – 1856 and 1859 – 1866). Finally, it was placed right on the border between the two provinces in Ottawa (1866 to present day). This tour ventures into each of these five cities and explores what makes them so unique.

Since the capital flip-flopped location seven times, it would be much more convenient to go through the cities geographically then historically. If we started in the West, we would start in Toronto, Ontario, Canada's biggest city. While G Adventures only mentions the CN Tower and Kensington Market, there is much more to see in this city. You could visit the 18th century Casa Loma Castle, stroll through the artistic Graffiti Alley, visit Ripley's Aquatic Aquarium, or go drink and dine in the Distillery District. Looking for more outdoorsy stuff? Check out the Toronto Islands, the famous High Park or the Toronto Zoo. You can even take a boat out onto Lake Ontario and see the city's iconic skyline!

Read More

Charlottetown to Quebec City - My Ford EcoSport Adventure

Last week Ford Canada flew my sister Krystal and I out to Prince Edward Island to take part in their Cross-Canada #FordEcoSport Tour. We were only the fifth of fifteen groups that will take part in the tour, so be sure to follow the hashtag to see what everybody is getting up to as well.

Our section of the tour was probably one of the longest in the program, as we had to drive from Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island to Saint John, New Brunswick, then to Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec and ending in Quebec City. The whole distance is about 1,020 kilometres, which is about 10 hours of driving, assuming we didn't stop to see anything along the way.

But, naturally, we stopped plenty.

Read More