Where to Golf in Lethbridge, Alberta

Where to Golf in Lethbridge, Alberta September 2, 2018 · 3 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

I'll be the first to admit I'm not a good golfer. I don't know my putters very well, I don't know my own driving strength and for some reason I tend to always hit the ball into the water, the sand pit or a tree. But, just because I'm not very good at it doesn't mean I don't enjoy it.

Earlier this month I had the opportunity to visit two golf courses while in Lethbridge. One was Evergreen Golf Centre, a family-friendly golf course, and the other was Paradise Canyon Golf Resort, a picturesque course sitting in the edge of Oldman River.

Looking for a golfing getaway? Lethbridge is your perfect place to stay and play!

Evergreen Golf Centre has a nine-hole course, a driving range and a mini putt course for children. The holes range from 65 to 310 yards and meander between trees, ponds and sand pits. The course is small, but comfortable enough for a leisurely golf game.

Evergreen Golfing Centre Red Ball at Evergreen

If golfing isn't your thing, or you need a way to blow off some steam after a failed drive, Evergreen also has an adjacent go-kart course. The karts go up the thirty kilometres an hour, and the course has more than enough turns that you are bound to bump into something. Driving the course is thrilling, but also very safe, so it is an activity for people of all ages. 

Go-karting at Evergreen Go-karting at Evergreen

Paradise Canyon Golf Resort, in contrast, has a full eighteen-hole course. It's a sprawling course, with many of the holes venturing close to the 700-yard mark. All levels of golfers are welcome, but the course is challenging. Each hole is segregated into four different sections for different levels of players. Some of the holes are even uniquely designed, such as Hole 12, which is downhill. This hole offers an incredible view of the valley as well as a challenge to the most experienced players.

Sandbar in Paradise Hole 5 in Paradise Hole 12 in Paradise

Paradise is such a beautiful course, in fact, that it played host to the PGA MacKenzie Tour this past summer. The tour was one of the largest golfing tournaments in North America, bringing this lesser known golfing resort into international spotlight.

There's plenty more I saw while in golfing in Lethbridge, so if you're interested in taking a trip out there, read my article on ZenSeekera.ca.

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Where to Golf in Lethbridge, Alberta Where to Golf in Lethbridge, Alberta

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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Where to Golf in Lethbridge, Alberta

I'll be the first to admit I'm not a good golfer. I don't know my putters very well, I don't know my own driving strength and for some reason I tend to always hit the ball into the water, the sand pit or a tree. But, just because I'm not very good at it doesn't mean I don't enjoy it.

Earlier this month I had the opportunity to visit two golf courses while in Lethbridge. One was Evergreen Golf Centre, a family-friendly golf course, and the other was Paradise Canyon Golf Resort, a picturesque course sitting in the edge of Oldman River.

Looking for a golfing getaway? Lethbridge is your perfect place to stay and play!

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