Waterton Lakes Solo Or For The Romantic

Waterton Lakes Solo Or For The Romantic January 22, 2018 · 3 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

Written by: Joanne Elves.

Wouldn't it be nice to be surrounded by beautiful mountains, frozen waterfalls and wildlife? But without the crowds? Waterton Lakes National Park in southwest Alberta is the unplugged uncrowded mountain town to do all that. Most of the businesses shutter up for winter but there is just enough open to keep anyone looking for a quiet #BucketlistAB adventure happy.

Even though the park suffered severe fire damage during the summer of 2017, the town was saved and is welcoming visitors. Much of the backcountry trails and campsites have to be inspected for safety but that doesn't mean you can't visit. This is your chance to see just how mother nature uses fire to start fresh. The spring flowers of 2018 will be outstanding.

By The Lake

Close to 100% of the visitation to Waterton Lakes National Park are in the spring to fall months. And who can blame them; spring brings a spectacular showing of wildflowers, summer is hot and fall brings the display of mating antics of the ungulates. In winter, most businesses and services board up the shops but a handful stay open to the delight of anyone wanting a quiet retreat.

To read more about this Waterton winter retreat and to find other excellent western Canada adventures check out the SnowSeekers.ca website.

A couple of hotels stay open for winter including the Waterton Glacier Suites and the Waterton Lakes Lodge Resort. I stayed at the Waterton Glacier Suites this time right in the heart of the silent town. Light meals can be made in your room but its far more fun enjoy meals next the fire in the Red Rock Café.

Fresh snow means fresh tracks and Waterton does get it's share of snow. Snowshoeing and cross-country skiing along the trails unaffected by the fire yours. You might see a white-tail deer or goat but other than that, you are on your own.

Snowshowing around Waterton Snowshowing around Waterton

Walks around the town are easy because it's so compact. The shuttered Prince of Wales Hotel up on the ridge has epic views of the lakes and the mountains. Down on the trail to Kootenay Brown's gravesite you might see Tundra swans on Waterton River. And almost everywhere in town and over at Cameron Falls you'll bump into white-tail deer and elk.

Wildlife in Waterton

The pace is laid back, unspoiled, untouched and unhurried. Take a book or maybe a magazine or a date and unplug.

Of course, if it's a pow day and you want to ski, Castle Mountain Ski Resort isn't far away. You can discover more about Castle and all the other western Canadian ski resorts on the SnowSeekers.ca webpage.

#explorealberta with SnowSeekers' #BucketlistAB Expedition. Uncover what's in store now by visiting http://www.snowseekers.ca/expedition/bucketlistAB.

All images belong to Rhonda Steed.

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Written by: Joanne Elves.

Wouldn't it be nice to be surrounded by beautiful mountains, frozen waterfalls and wildlife? But without the crowds? Waterton Lakes National Park in southwest Alberta is the unplugged uncrowded mountain town to do all that. Most of the businesses shutter up for winter but there is just enough open to keep anyone looking for a quiet #BucketlistAB adventure happy.

Even though the park suffered severe fire damage during the summer of 2017, the town was saved and is welcoming visitors. Much of the backcountry trails and campsites have to be inspected for safety but that doesn't mean you can't visit. This is your chance to see just how mother nature uses fire to start fresh. The spring flowers of 2018 will be outstanding.

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