Up And Coming Medicine Hat's Must Sees

Up And Coming Medicine Hat's Must Sees January 15, 2018 · 3 min. readDisclaimer: While the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

Written by: Karen Ung, Play Outside Guide.

"Have you ever been to Medicine Hat?" Abby Czibere from the Visitor Centre asks. I feel bad when I tell her no, unless you count stopping to fill up and grab fast food. In short order, I realize that's a big mistake as there's a vibrant food and arts scene and beautiful riverside parks to explore in this city of 65,000 people.

The Hat (the city's nickname; its residents are Hatters) has experienced a renaissance in recent years thanks to innovative entrepreneurs. Trendy eateries, indie coffee shops, and craft breweries have opened, attracting like-minded businesses, while enticing young people to stick around after college. Even the museums add to the up and coming feeling with their unique exhibits and events. Smell the smells of war at Esplanade Arts and Heritage Centre, or attend a concert in a massive kiln at MedAlta Potteries (Tongue on the Post Music Festival).

Read more at SnowSeekers here: The Hat gets hip: Coffee, craft beer and one cool clay factory.

Local Food Eateries in Medicine Hat Most photographed wall in Medicine Hat

If you only have a day, here are the top 5 must sees in Medicine Hat:

  1. Historic Downtown is best explored on foot or by bike. Take the self guided Art Walk to galleries and studios, discover the city's coffee culture, or window shop.
  2. MedAlta will wow you with the way things were at the height of the ceramics industry when Medicine Hat was exporting ceramics and bricks worldwide. The original, century-old buildings are still standing and home to many special events.
  3. Esplanade Arts and Heritage Centre has a large gallery with permanent and rotating exhibits, and theatre space that hosts dance and musical performances.
  4. Medicine Hat Brewing Company makes "timeless craft beer" onsite and offers beer tastings, dining, and brewery tours. Every beer has been named for a local person or place of historical significance. Pick up a plaid souvenir while you're there!
  5. Police Point Park and Interpretive Centre is a huge natural area near the South Saskatchewan River with year round interpretive programs and tons of trails to explore. Snowshoe and cross country ski rentals are available in the winter.
Medicine Hat Assiniboia Inn

Medicine Hat's sunny climate and friendly people are sure to win you over! For more information on things to do and where to stay, read Karen's story at SnowSeekers: The Hat gets hip: Coffee, craft beer and one cool clay factory.

#explorealberta with SnowSeekers' #BucketlistAB Expedition. Uncover what's in store now by visiting http://www.snowseekers.ca/expedition/bucketlistAB.

All images belong to by Karen Ung of Play Outside Guide.

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