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Unrooming The Delta Bessborough

Unrooming The Delta Bessborough September 13, 2016 · 2 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

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The Delta Bessborough Hotel is Saskatoon's most picturesque landmark. It was constructed during the Great Depression and was one of the many projects that helped save Saskatoon's struggling downtown area. The hotel is a premium destination for work functions, receptions, weddings or just weekend trips to the Paris of the Prairies. Supposedly haunted – although the receptionist claims the only spirits in the hotel are the ones served at the bar – they also have ghost tours in October in anticipation for Halloween.

It would come to no surprise then that when Hotels.com approached me to "unroom" a suite of any hotel of my choosing, I immediately chose the Bessborough. For those who don't know, "unrooming" is similar to "unboxing", which is when a person records their first impressions and reactions when opening something for the first time, may it be a new iPhone or a television. Instead of unboxing a product however, this time I was unrooming a room.

Check out my video and pictures below to see what's in store for you if you plan to stay at the hotel!

Hotel.com also has several more Unrooming videos from around the world, so feel free to check them out!

Have you ever visited the Bess? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below!

Delta Bessborough inside room Delta Bessborough front of hotel Delta Bessborough back of hotel Delta Bessborough back of hotel Delta Bessborough back of hotel Delta Bessborough back of hotel Delta Bessborough from across river Delta Bessborough from across river Delta Bessborough from across river Delta Bessborough view from room Delta Bessborough view from room

Don't forget to pin it!

Unrooming The Delta Bessborough with Hotels.com Unrooming The Delta Bessborough with Hotels.com

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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