Unrooming The Delta Bessborough

Unrooming The Delta Bessborough September 13, 2016 · 2 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. This article may also contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

The Delta Bessborough Hotel is Saskatoon's most picturesque landmark. It was constructed during the Great Depression and was one of the many projects that helped save Saskatoon's struggling downtown area. The hotel is a premium destination for work functions, receptions, weddings or just weekend trips to the Paris of the Prairies. Supposedly haunted – although the receptionist claims the only spirits in the hotel are the ones served at the bar – they also have ghost tours in October in anticipation for Halloween.

It would come to no surprise then that when Hotels.com approached me to "unroom" a suite of any hotel of my choosing, I immediately chose the Bessborough. For those who don't know, "unrooming" is similar to "unboxing", which is when a person records their first impressions and reactions when opening something for the first time, may it be a new iPhone or a television. Instead of unboxing a product however, this time I was unrooming a room.

Check out my video and pictures below to see what's in store for you if you plan to stay at the hotel!

Hotel.com also has several more Unrooming videos from around the world, so feel free to check them out!

Have you ever visited the Bess? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below!

Delta Bessborough inside room Delta Bessborough front of hotel Delta Bessborough back of hotel Delta Bessborough back of hotel Delta Bessborough back of hotel Delta Bessborough back of hotel Delta Bessborough from across river Delta Bessborough from across river Delta Bessborough from across river Delta Bessborough view from room Delta Bessborough view from room

Don't forget to pin it!

Unrooming The Delta Bessborough with Hotels.com Unrooming The Delta Bessborough with Hotels.com

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

Sharing this article helps the blog grow!

Get Your Complete List of What to See & Do in Regina!

Others are reading...

Unrooming The Delta Bessborough

The Delta Bessborough Hotel is Saskatoon's most picturesque landmark. It was constructed during the Great Depression and was one of the many projects that helped save Saskatoon's struggling downtown area. The hotel is a premium destination for work functions, receptions, weddings or just weekend trips to the Paris of the Prairies. Supposedly haunted – although the receptionist claims the only spirits in the hotel are the ones served at the bar – they also have ghost tours in October in anticipation for Halloween.

It would come to no surprise then that when Hotels.com approached me to "unroom" a suite of any hotel of my choosing, I immediately chose the Bessborough. For those who don't know, "unrooming" is similar to "unboxing", which is when a person records their first impressions and reactions when opening something for the first time, may it be a new iPhone or a television. Instead of unboxing a product however, this time I was unrooming a room.

Check out my video and pictures below to see what's in store for you if you plan to stay at the hotel!

Read More

Journey to Spookytown

Imagine a town full of zombies, ghouls, ghosts and spooks, all living in harmony. It's tough to wrap your head around (unless your name is Linda Blair) but that's exactly what you'll find in Spookytown – a miniature Halloween village, created by Jessica Nuttall.

Spookytown began in 2004 with the purchase of Castle Blackstone. This towering fortress began a 14+ year passion to build a community for the living, dead and undead to coexist together. After Castle Blackstone came the construction of the cemetery, the business district and then the "spooky" end of town, which holds the magnificent Victorian Mansion. The town includes hotels, cathedrals, restaurants, cafes, museums and a grain elevator. The town is like any other small town during the day – quiet, peaceful and relatively pleasant, but once night falls, Spookytown becomes a creepy village full of flashing lights, blood curdling screams and eerie music.

When asked about the population of Spookytown, Nuttall answered "Dead or alive?", followed by a mischievous smile. A quick headcount found about 75 spooks hidden among the village's dozen buildings, but that might not include the ones living in the buildings or sleeping within their coffins.

Read More

8 Places to Visit in Montreal

Nestled between the impressive Mount Royal and the majestic St. Lawrence River is Montreal, a city known for its festivals, abstract art, history and mosaic of countless cultures. Montreal is the second largest city in Canada, with a population floating around four million people. While the city is a dynamic mix of Canada's two primary cultures – French and English – there are areas of the city that are culturally specific, such as Little Italy, Greektown and Chinatown. Known for its artistic and liberal mindedness, Montreal also boasts the largest community of homosexuals in North America in their very own "Gay Village".

Being nearly 375 years old, Montreal was pivotal to the creation of New France and Canada and at a time held control over every waterway from the St. Lawrence down to the Gulf of Mexico. Having such incredible influence over the western part of the New World, Montreal hosted the "Great Peace of Montreal" in 1701, which started sixteen years of peace between the French and over 40 different First Nation tribes in North America.

Since its early days, Montreal has been one of the most influential cities in Canada.  Montreal housed "internment camps" during World War I, became an ideal location for Americans looking for alcohol during Prohibition, and was the official residence of the Luxembourg royal family during World War II. Montreal held host to the incredible Expo 67, showcasing some of the most incredible architecture of that decade.  The seventies saw serious political reformation in Montreal, with many Americans arriving, fleeing the Vietnam Draft. The late seventies paralyzed the city as a terrorist organization, the Front de libération du Québec, detonated explosives throughout the city and kidnapped and killed political figures. These actions forced the Prime Minster to enact the "War Measures Act" and deploy the military into the city to apprehend the terrorists. The eighties and nineties saw two referendums in the province of Quebec to separate from Canada, with Montreal playing a major role in both decisions. The last referendum in 1995 ended with 51% percent of Quebecers wanting to remain part of Canada and 49% wanting to separate.

Read More