Top 10 ½ Tallest Statues in Saskatchewan – Second Edition

Top 10 ½ Tallest Statues in Saskatchewan – Second Edition February 28, 2019 · 10 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

We all make mistakes, and Norway's crossing of Moose Jaw won't be forgotten anytime soon. With a lasting Moose Truce nowhere in sight, tensions between The Land of the Living Skies and the Land of the Midnight Sun have never been more antler-raising. Moose Jaw is holding a summit of Norwegian politicians the next few days to find a moos-lution and Justin and Greg have opted to flee the country all together (or maybe they went to a hockey game in Vegas… tough to tell what those two are up to sometimes!).

In the meantime, unlike Norway, I can admit when I made a mistake. A few weeks past I wrote "The Top 10 ½ Tallest Statues in Saskatchewan" following countless hours of research… and within 30 minutes of hitting "publish", I received a correction. As the days rolled by more and more corrections came in, I decided a whole new list would be needed.

When creating this revised list, I had to make one rule: vehicles on top of stilts or on tall platforms do not count as statues. I didn't think I would have to make parameters around what a "statue" is, but I had to enforce this one or else I would be calling farms all around the province. So, sorry, Craik's Motorcycle Tower! Your farm owner didn't call me back and now he ruined it for everybody!

If I get something wrong again (fingers crossed), just go read Robin and Arlene Karpan's Larger Than Life: Saskatchewan's Big Roadside Monuments because they've done far more research than me.

So, here are The Top 10 ½ Tallest Statues in Saskatchewan – Second Edition, with special thanks to Tourism Weyburn, The City of Weyburn, Tourism Estevan and Tourism Prince Albert for all their help

1. Parkside's Lilly and Lloydminster's Sky Dance

26 feet, or 7.9 metres tall.

On my first list Parkside's Lilly was number five, so you can tell the items on this list are going to be much taller than before.

Parkside's Lilly was created in 1990 in honour of Dr. A.J. Porter's 1934 plant nursery, which is now a provincial heritage property. Lloydminster's Sky Dance was created in 2005 in honour of Saskatchewan's centennial.

Parkside's Lilly and Lloydminster's Sky Dance

2. Bellevue's Pea-Plant

31 feet, or 9.5 metres tall.

A lot of people were excited to see Bellevue on my list since this cute little French community needs way more love than it gets, so I was worried when I was recreating this list that it would get snapped (both a pea reference, and a Marvel reference). Thankfully, this pea-plant statue that was built in 1995 just squeaks into the list.

Bellevue's Pea-Plant

3. Macklin's Bunnock and Moose Jaw's Mac the Moose

32 feet, or 9.8 metres tall.

It's tough to believe that the province's most famous moose, and the one that caused the Moose War, is a pipsqueak on the list of tallest statues. Mac the Moose was built in 1984 with the goal of attracting visitors to the city, while Macklin's Bunnock (horse ankle bone) structure was built in 1993 in honour of their community's love of the game.

Macklin's Bunnock and Moose Jaw's Mac the Moose

4. Sceptre's Wheat and Langenburg's Goliath Swing

33 feet, or 10 metres tall.

Sceptre claims to have the tallest wheat sculpture in the world, but as stated in my last article (and this one) they aren't even close. Although I visited Sceptre a few summers back, I missed this giant sculpture. It was built in 1990.

Langenburg's Goliath Swing is a new addition to this list, and is the third variation of its kind, with previous versions being constructed in 1984 and 1986. This one was also built in 1990 in Gopherville. In 2004 it was moved to Langenburg.

Sceptre's Wheat and Langenburg's Goliath Swing

5. Ituna's Oat Stem and Prince Albert's Eaglechild Totem Pole

34 feet, or 10.4 metres tall.

Although Ituna.ca says their sculpture is only 30-feet-tall, other sources say it is 34-feet-tall. Either way, this massive oat stem sculpture was created in 2014 by the Prairie Oat Growers Association. Canada is the third largest oat producer in the world, behind Russia and the EU, and this sculpture was to recognize that.

Prince Albert's Eaglechild totem pole, on the other hand, was constructed in 1975 by James Sutherland and several other Indigenous inmates from the Prince Albert penitentiary. They presented it as a gift to the city after over 100 hours of work. The totem pole is so large that the city had to hire people to specifically erect the giant statue.

(It's also way bigger than Regina's totem pole.)

Ituna's Oat Stem and Prince Albert's Eaglechild

6. Cut Knife's Tomahawk and Teepee

39.4 feet, or 12 metres tall.

Created in 1971 in honour of the anniversary of the 1871 treaty signing, this massive statue embraces First Nations culture by showcasing their most iconic symbols: a tomahawk and a teepee. In my earlier article I mentioned that the handle of the tomahawk was made out of a tree trunk, but apparently it has now been replaced with metal as the handle began to rot.

Cut Knife's Tomahawk and Teepee

7. Rosthern's Wheat

43 feet, or 13.1 metres tall.

Towering ten feet higher than Sceptre's wheat statue, this statue was created in honour local farmer Seager Wheeler who won five world championships for his wheat. I'm still unable to determine when it was built, but I can tell you it is not the tallest wheat statue in the province. That title belongs to…

Rosthern's Wheat

8. Weyburn's Wheat (x6)

45 – 50 feet, or 13.72 – 25.36 metres

Towering far above Rosthern's wheat statue, Weyburn's wheat statues are the largest in the province (or at least what I was able to find). Built between 2002-2003 these statues were constructed when the city received a Centenary Fund of $150,000. The sculptures were created by Louis Guigon, with their iconic drooping sheaths to symbolize overabundance. If you go to visit them, you'll also see a bronze statue of Tommy Douglas, the founder of Medicare.

Weyburn's Wheat

Aberdeen's Pro-Life Millennium Cross

100 feet, or 30.48 metres

In 1994, Joseph Bayda Sr., was looking out his kitchen window and was inspired to erect a cross on a hill. Bayda expressed his dream to Myra Olver, and she replied that she would pray for a sign if the cross was to be built. Almost a year later that sign was given when an old woman delivered Olver a birthday card on St. Therese's birthday. When Olver went to thank the woman, she had disappeared. Immediately afterwards, Olver called Bayda and preparations to construct the cross began.

Twelve years later, in 2006, a 100-foot-high steel cross was constructed in Aberdeen. This Pro-Life Millennium Cross has become an annual pilgrimage destination in Saskatchewan, with the last pilgrimage being September 16, 2018.

Aberdeen's Pro-Life Millennium Cross

9 ½ . Lloydminster's Border Markers

100 feet, or 30.48 metres

These four border markers were the top of my previous list, but they have since been dethroned for a new champion. Erected in 1994, these border markers were created to mark the boundary between Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Lloydminster's Border Markers

10 ½ . Estevan's Oil Derrick

110 feet, or 33.53 metres

I heard various reports about this oil derrick. Was is still standing? Was it 100 feet tall, or 150 feet tall? Is it on the West side of the city, or outside Tourism Estevan's office? It took many, many phone-calls to determine that it is still standing, it's 110 feet tall and it's on the West side of the city. Why it's there and when it was constructed though, still eludes me. Nevertheless, it's the tallest statue in Saskatchewan.

(At least for now…)

Estevan's Oil Derrick

There are a handful of other honourable mentions in the province too. While these are not the tallest, they're still weird, quirky and fun. They are Davidson's Coffeepot (24 feet tall), Rocanville Oil Can (23 feet tall), Daphne's Tireman (25 feet tall) and Turtleford Turtle (8 feet tall, but 28 feet long). If you want to read more about them, check out Robin and Arlene Karpan's Larger Than Life: Saskatchewan's Big Roadside Monuments book.

I'm hopefully not writing a third version of this article, but do you know of any other tall statues in the province? Tell me about them in the comments below!

Don't forget to pin it!

Top 10 ½ Tallest Statues in Saskatchewan – Second Edition Top 10 ½ Tallest Statues in Saskatchewan – Second Edition

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

Get Your Complete List of What to See & Do in Regina!

You might also enjoy

110 Nature Hot Spots in Manitoba and Saskatchewan

I've known Jenn Smith Nelson for several years now, and I often look up to her for inspiration and guidance on how to grow with my blog. I remember hearing about her book over a year ago, and I've been holding my breath in anticipation ever since.

Smith Nelson teamed up with Doug O'Neill, another talented travel writer, to cover two Canadian provinces. Their new book, 110 Nature Hot Spots in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, is a part of a Firefly Books series that showcase Canada's diversity of nature.

 (Other books in the Firefly Books series include 125 Nature Hot Spots in Alberta, 100 Nature Hot Spots in British Columbia and 110 Nature Hot Spots in Ontario.)

Read More

What To Do in Historic Philadelphia

A few months ago I entered a contest for a trip for two to visit Philadelphia on Two Bad Tourists. Normally contests like this are limited to United States residents so when I saw this one was open to Canadians I jumped at the chance. I've never won something like this before, so I actually forgot about it until I got the emailing saying I had won. Two Bad Tourists then worked alongside Visit Philly to organise the trip for me and my mother to explore Philadelphia for three days. Visit Philly paid for our flights, hotels and gave us a VIP Pass to experience the city to our heart's content. It is thanks to them that this trip is possible.

Several movies and television shows have tried to capture the essence of Philadelphia over the years – from the boxing Blockbuster Rocky, to the paranormal thriller The Sixth Sense, to It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia and even Boy Meets World – but each described the city differently. There is no easy way to approach a city as dynamic as The City of Brotherly Love. With countless layers of art, history, religion and the paranormal, Philadelphia is a city unlike any other throughout the United States. 

One thing that surprised me the most about Philadelphia was the history. The city was founded and designed by William Penn, who is also the state of Pennsylvania's namesake. Born in London, England in 1644 he lived through The Great Fire of 1666 and The Great Plague of London from 1665-1666. Both events shaped Penn's life so he designed the city to be strictly stone buildings (to stop fires from spreading) and to have plenty of space between the buildings (as to prevent illness from spreading). This led to the older areas of the city to have winding corridors between old stone walls.

Read More

Win A Trip to the Strangest City in the World

Frank Albo is known to many as "The Dan Brown of Canada". He gained this informal title through his many decades of research, interviews and investigations into the secrets of the Manitoba Legislature. Through his work, he claims that Winnipeg was meant to have a much larger role in Canada – going so far to say that it was to be the "Jerusalem of the New World".

It may sound odd, but there are a lot of strange motifs within the Manitoba Legislature that otherwise wouldn't make sense. These include being the exact dimensions of King Solomon's Temple, having medusas and demons guarding the entrances, and a "black star" of sacrifice beneath the rotunda. Stranger still is that none of these symbols are in the visually similar Saskatchewan Legislature which was constructed about the same time and for the same purpose. For some reason, the Manitoba Legislature was uniquely created in this manner.

Albo's research has not only gotten a lot of attention in Canada, but international attention too. One of these people was His Excellency Konstantin Zhigalov, Ambassador of the Republic of Kazakhstan. While visiting Winnipeg in 2014, Zhigalov attended Albo's tour. After it concluded, Zhigalov pulled Albo aside and invited him to the capital of Kazakhstan. The request was peculiar, but the moment Albo arrived, he knew exactly why he was chosen.

Read More