Signs of the Pandemic Times in Regina

Signs of the Pandemic Times in Regina

April 26, 2020 · 4 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

This is a hard article for me to write. On one side, it is easy because I am going to let the pictures do most of the talking. On the other side, it is really, really difficult. It is difficult because for every "closed" sign on a door, there is a family without money, a table without food, a student without a job, a business without a profit and a future that is uncertain.

Even though the Premier of Saskatchewan has put out a 5-step plan to reopen the province, nothing is happening for at least another month. A lot of businesses, restaurants, shops and stores will never be reopened. Post-pandemic Regina will be quite different than just a few months ago.

I think it is fair to say that nobody will take for granted a festival, a concert, a sports game or any type of event ever again. Nobody will take for granted steady employment, a paycheque, a job or a future.

For me, this pandemic is a double-edged sword. I have been trying to raise awareness for the Spanish Influenza pandemic for the past few years. Ever since the monument was created in 2017, I've been doing lectures, talks and articles all about it – with many of them falling on deaf ears. I've held lectures on both provincial and federal levels and rarely is there even a crowd. Only a handful of my friends came, and nobody from the heritage organization I volunteered at bothered to show up. I must admit, it is great to have people care about my research, and listen to what I have to say. I am fielding questions about the Spanish Influenza almost every day, which is a dream come true.

But the cost of that is something I never wished to happen.

We are fortunate that the COVID-19 pandemic is not as bad as the Spanish Influenza pandemic. The virus isn't as fatal, we have proper protocols in place, and we have an understanding of how germs spread. But the economic damage it caused is something that will define many of us for years to come.

There isn't much we can do differently now than what we did back in 1918, but there is one thing. Historians and universities around the world are asking people to record their daily lives. This doesn't necessarily mean making TikTok videos or vlog updates. It could be as simple as a diary, a ledger, a scrapbook or any kind of art. We have as much understanding of how people spent their lives during the Spanish Influenza as during the Black Death. Please record as much as you can about your daily lives, as historians will love it in the future.

This blog post will be a minor contribution to that. This is a collection of storefronts, signage and posters around the city of Regina that have been impacted by the pandemic. Many of them will never open again, but I hope the best for each and every one of them.

I took all these pictures between April 20th and April 25th.

We can pull together We are in this together Thank you at Government House Everything is going to be okay Writing on the wall Writing on the school wall Hotel Saskatchewan Heart Bus shelter Playground Playground Public Schools Closed Canadian Western Agribition Evraz Sign Evraz Sign Luther College Royal Sask Museum RCMP Heritage Centre City Hall Jugo Juice Press'd Chopped Leaf Dots Globe Theatre Madame Yes Carlson Travel Good Earth Coffee Copper Kettle and O'Hans Leopold's Tavern Spex By Ryan Closed store with hours Traditions Chinese health store Awarehouse Books Cathedral Bakery Pet store Boss Boutique 33 Coffee Uforia Blush Beauty Bar Cathedral antique clothing store Sign behind bars Pacific Fresh Fish Paper Umbrella Bushwakker Centennial Mall Everyday Kitchen Gabbos in Neon Mikey Serindipity Southland Shopping Centre Ukranian Co-Op Southend Regina Public Library

The following were also submitted by Lori Sullivan on Twitter. Thank you for sending them!

Door with sign on it Playground with caution tape Picnic table closed Playground closed Playground closed Prevent the spread Stay Safe in window

Stay safe, wash your hands and when this is over, shop local, buy local and support local. We will get through this together.

Don't forget to pin it!

Signs of the Pandemic Times in Regina Signs of the Pandemic Times in Regina

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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Signs of the Pandemic Times in Regina

This is a hard article for me to write. On one side, it is easy because I am going to let the pictures do most of the talking. On the other side, it is really, really difficult. It is difficult because for every "closed" sign on a door, there is a family without money, a table without food, a student without a job, a business without a profit and a future that is uncertain.

Even though the Premier of Saskatchewan has put out a 5-step plan to reopen the province, nothing is happening for at least another month. A lot of businesses, restaurants, shops and stores will never be reopened. Post-pandemic Regina will be quite different than just a few months ago.

I think it is fair to say that nobody will take for granted a festival, a concert, a sports game or any type of event ever again. Nobody will take for granted steady employment, a paycheque, a job or a future.

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My day began with another very good breakfast of salami, cinnamon rolls, eggs, toast and vanilla yogurt. Then we got to explore Munich!

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I didn't know how to get there from my hotel, so I asked the lady at the front desk. Although she had decent English, she had no idea what I was asking. I wrote it down and she googled it, and came back with a map. She explained what subway to get onto, how many stops to take, and how to get from the subway to the HQ and back. I thanked her, and left.

Leaving the subway station, it didn't take me long to see the top of the building from afar. However, it was much more difficult navigating the winding streets to get to it. Add to that, the sky was overcast and there was a very distant rumble coming from the clouds. It was either because I misunderstood the seriousness of the thundering clouds, or because it was obvious I had no idea where I was going, but a Japanese man who's English was comparable to my Japanese buzzed his car over, ran up to me and asked if I needed help. I showed him my map and he gestured to his little Japanese car to get in; he would take me there. My mother told me to never get into vehicles with strangers, but I sized up the small man who I was about a foot taller and about 100 pounds heavier than he, so I got in his car.

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