Secrets for Visiting the Remington Carriage Museum

Secrets for Visiting the Remington Carriage Museum January 18, 2018 · 3 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

Written by: Karen Ung, Play Outside Guide.

The Remington Carriage Museum in Cardston, Alberta boasts North America's largest carriage collection, interactive displays, a working restoration shop, gift shop, concession, and beautiful parklike grounds. With 270 carriages in 64,000 square feet, how do you begin to explore "The Best Indoor Attraction in Canada"? (source: Attractions Canada)

Learn more at SnowSeekers.ca: Discover our motoring past at Remington Carriage Museum

Remington Carriage Museum From Above

1. Plan Ahead: Check the museum's Special Events page so you can time your visit right. From equestrian events like the RCMP Musical Ride to the holiday Festival of Lights, there is always something fun going at the museum! In summer, the museum offers carriage rides and wagon rides (extra charge), weather permitting.

RCMP Musical Ride

2. Short on time? Hit the must-sees first!

  • Watch the 15 minute movie "Wheels of Change" set in the year 1899. It provides a good introduction to the rise and fall of the carriage industry. Runs on the hour in summer, or when people are there in winter.
  • Check out the new exhibit, McLaughlin Story: 150 Years of Carriages, Cars and Canada Dry, that was built for Canada's 150th birthday.
  • Visitors with kids won't want to miss Horse University, the virtual mini chuckwagon races, and virtual wagon ride.
  • Get a photo taken in a movie stagecoach built by Don Remington and used in the Shanghai Noon and Crossfire Trail.
  • Visit the Restoration Shop for a blacksmithing, woodworking, or metalworking demonstration and learn how carriages are built and repaired.
Remington Cart Remington Cart Remington Cart Remington Cart

3. Take a FREE Guided Tour: Knowledgeable and passionate staff bring the horsedrawn era to life with their stories. They also point out features you might miss if exploring on your own - beautiful Tulip lamps and squeaky leather suspension (used for 2,000 years!), for example - and tell you who those people in the cutouts are. Love royalty? Queen Elizabeth II has ridden in two carriages here!

4. Ask Questions: Don't be shy; museum staff love to answer questions.

5. Take a Break: Go for a walk around the grounds, or take a carriage ride (summer only), grab a bite to eat at the concession, or browse the gift shop, then explore the rest of the exhibits as time allows.

Statue of horse at museum

If you love learning about history, purchase an Experience Alberta's History Annual Pass for free admission to all of Alberta's heritage facilities!

Read the whole scoop at at SnowSeekers.ca: Discover our motoring past at Remington Carriage Museum

#explorealberta with SnowSeekers' #BucketlistAB Expedition. Uncover what's in store now by visiting http://www.snowseekers.ca/expedition/bucketlistAB.

All images belong to by Karen Ung of Play Outside Guide.

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Secrets for Visiting the Remington Carriage Museum Secrets for Visiting the Remington Carriage Museum

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