Secrets for Visiting the Remington Carriage Museum

Secrets for Visiting the Remington Carriage Museum January 18, 2018 · 3 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

Written by: Karen Ung, Play Outside Guide.

The Remington Carriage Museum in Cardston, Alberta boasts North America's largest carriage collection, interactive displays, a working restoration shop, gift shop, concession, and beautiful parklike grounds. With 270 carriages in 64,000 square feet, how do you begin to explore "The Best Indoor Attraction in Canada"? (source: Attractions Canada)

Learn more at SnowSeekers.ca: Discover our motoring past at Remington Carriage Museum

Remington Carriage Museum From Above

1. Plan Ahead: Check the museum's Special Events page so you can time your visit right. From equestrian events like the RCMP Musical Ride to the holiday Festival of Lights, there is always something fun going at the museum! In summer, the museum offers carriage rides and wagon rides (extra charge), weather permitting.

RCMP Musical Ride

2. Short on time? Hit the must-sees first!

  • Watch the 15 minute movie "Wheels of Change" set in the year 1899. It provides a good introduction to the rise and fall of the carriage industry. Runs on the hour in summer, or when people are there in winter.
  • Check out the new exhibit, McLaughlin Story: 150 Years of Carriages, Cars and Canada Dry, that was built for Canada's 150th birthday.
  • Visitors with kids won't want to miss Horse University, the virtual mini chuckwagon races, and virtual wagon ride.
  • Get a photo taken in a movie stagecoach built by Don Remington and used in the Shanghai Noon and Crossfire Trail.
  • Visit the Restoration Shop for a blacksmithing, woodworking, or metalworking demonstration and learn how carriages are built and repaired.
Remington Cart Remington Cart Remington Cart Remington Cart

3. Take a FREE Guided Tour: Knowledgeable and passionate staff bring the horsedrawn era to life with their stories. They also point out features you might miss if exploring on your own - beautiful Tulip lamps and squeaky leather suspension (used for 2,000 years!), for example - and tell you who those people in the cutouts are. Love royalty? Queen Elizabeth II has ridden in two carriages here!

4. Ask Questions: Don't be shy; museum staff love to answer questions.

5. Take a Break: Go for a walk around the grounds, or take a carriage ride (summer only), grab a bite to eat at the concession, or browse the gift shop, then explore the rest of the exhibits as time allows.

Statue of horse at museum

If you love learning about history, purchase an Experience Alberta's History Annual Pass for free admission to all of Alberta's heritage facilities!

Read the whole scoop at at SnowSeekers.ca: Discover our motoring past at Remington Carriage Museum

#explorealberta with SnowSeekers' #BucketlistAB Expedition. Uncover what's in store now by visiting http://www.snowseekers.ca/expedition/bucketlistAB.

All images belong to by Karen Ung of Play Outside Guide.

Don't forget to pin it!

Secrets for Visiting the Remington Carriage Museum Secrets for Visiting the Remington Carriage Museum

Get Your Complete List of What to See & Do in Regina!

You might also enjoy

150 Facts About Canada

Although the hot summer days of July are long behind us, 2017 is still Canada's 150th year. In honour of Canada's sesquicentennial birthday, I decided to put together a list of 150 things about Canada. This list talks about our quirkiness, our strengths, our weakness, and our legacy, for better and for worse. There are some sad facts, some odd facts and some facts that will probably make you open another tab to look into for yourself.

Hope you enjoy this list, and I hope you all had a great 2017!

1. Canada's two official languages are French and English, but only 20.6% of Canadians speak French.

Read More

8 Easy Steps to Start Your Own Blog

When I started my blog, I wanted a place to tell stories. I wanted a place where I could keep memories and show them off for people later. My earliest entries on my blog are from 2011 (published in 2014), right after my trip to Europe. They're messy, they lack detail, and they are full of inaccuracies. Not the mention the wretched photography.

So, there's only been a slight improvement since then. Hahahahaha.

Four years later, my blog has become my hobby, my joy, my escape and my work. I spend hours writing content for my blog. I spend hours editing pictures, researching details, and adjusting content for SEO (search engine optimization). It's a full-time gig, and just the other day I published my 200th article. After 200 times of doing something, you'd think the articles would get easier, but they really don't. Each one is unique unto itself, and each one is a special time in my life that I shared with my readers.

Read More

Five Historic Canadian Cities

This is the second of five articles about trips to take across Canada. I was inspired to do this series after I was disappointed by what Canadian tours G Adventures offered on their website.

Canada's 150th birthday cannot be complete without visiting the country's capital city... but which one should you visit? While Ottawa is the current capital of Canada, there have been four other capital cities, and it has changed seven times. It started in Kingston (1841 – 1844) and then moved to Montréal (1844 – 1849), believing it to be safer from the Americans. After the citizens of Montréal burnt it down, it rotated between Toronto (1849 – 1852 and 1856 – 1858) and Québec City (1852 – 1856 and 1859 – 1866). Finally, it was placed right on the border between the two provinces in Ottawa (1866 to present day). This tour ventures into each of these five cities and explores what makes them so unique.

Since the capital flip-flopped location seven times, it would be much more convenient to go through the cities geographically then historically. If we started in the West, we would start in Toronto, Ontario, Canada's biggest city. While G Adventures only mentions the CN Tower and Kensington Market, there is much more to see in this city. You could visit the 18th century Casa Loma Castle, stroll through the artistic Graffiti Alley, visit Ripley's Aquatic Aquarium, or go drink and dine in the Distillery District. Looking for more outdoorsy stuff? Check out the Toronto Islands, the famous High Park or the Toronto Zoo. You can even take a boat out onto Lake Ontario and see the city's iconic skyline!

Read More