Saskatoon's Escape Manor is the Place to Beat

Saskatoon's Escape Manor is the Place to Beat March 15, 2019 · 5 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

About five years ago I tried my first escape room, and I've been a fan ever since. Solving puzzles is something the web developer in me absolutely loves, and I've lost count of the amount of escape rooms I've attempted. Each one I've done has been fun, challenging and rewarding, although often very frustrating – all of which keeps me going back for more.

Many escape rooms offer board games, food and drinks before the "big escape" but Escape Manor's new Saskatoon location brings entertainment to a whole new level. Along with drinks and delicious food from partnerships with a select group of restaurants downtown. They also have custom board games, axe-throwing and bocce ball. Axe-throwing is something I've seen before (and, yes, thank you everybody who messaged me on social media – I know there are axe-throwing places in Regina...) but I've never seen it offered in an escape room setting. After I saw it, I thought it fit in perfectly. The gleaming axes and splintered wood go along perfect with the lanterns, chains and distant screams of madness from down the hall.

Axe-throwing at Escape Manor Axe-throwing at Escape Manor

Saskatoon's Escape Manor also has a pillory as opposed to the Regina's Escape Manor's electric chair. I'm not sure which one I like more, since both are very cool, and very uncomfortable, but it does give the location an iconic touch.

Escape Manor's pillory Lights in Escape Manor

Saskatoon's Escape Manor has been in operation for a couple months now, but the night I attended was their grand opening. Since their doors opened earlier this year, they've gotten a lot of attention around the city, and everybody from young to old were at the grand opening, drinking, eating (delicious bites were prepared and complements of Bon Temps Cafe), laughing and playing games.

Escape Manor Bar Escape Manor decor Escape Manor sign

When the time came to cut the "ribbon", the five owners of the business brought out a massive, yellow chain and bolt cutters. They drew the chain tight, held up the bolt cutters, and the moment the chain snapped, balloons full of yellow confetti exploded throughout the room.

Ribbon Cutting at Escape Manor Champagne at Escape Manor

Following the "ribbon" cutting, speeches and pictures, I got a tour of the new space. Their first escape room, Asylum, is based on the premise of a mad doctor that has been conducting human experiments. With this comes a plethora of surgery tools, forewarning writings on the wall and a bloody surgery table. I attempted this escape room while it was at Regina's Escape Manor location several years ago, but I didn't quite make it out.

Asylum at Escape Manor

Their second room, Devil's Advocate, was completely different. This escape room is based around finding, and breaking, a contract you made with the Devil. This escape room was a clean, modern office with chic red and black decor. While Asylum is more based around solving and unlocking puzzles, I was told Devil's Advocate is more based around finding puzzle pieces and putting them together.

Devil's Advocate at Escape Manor

Escape Manor Regina is located downtown, but just off the beaten path on Broad Street, while Escape Manor Saskatoon can be found in the heart of the city.  Located near the intersection of 2nd Ave and 21st Street East, it's just blocks away from the iconic Remai Modern art gallery and the Delta Bessborough. It's also near a wide variety of restaurants, including 13 Pie, which serves some of the best pizza in the city.

Escape Manor in Saskatoon

I've visited several escape rooms before, and I was blown away by what Saskatoon's Escape Manor has to offer for entertainment. From axe throwing to bocce ball, board games to escape rooms, I can see it quickly becoming a staple of downtown Toontown and a popular stop for those in the neighbourhood.

Have you ever visited Escape Manor in Regina? Will you be visiting it in Saskatoon? Let me know in the comments below. 

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Saskatoon's Escape Manor is the Place to Beat Saskatoon's Escape Manor is the Place to Beat

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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