Return to London

Return to London January 18, 2015 · 6 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

It was a long drive to the ferry station. I ended up sleeping when we drove through the Somme, but I was awake when we drove past the Vimy Ridge Memorial. Although it was on the horizon when we drove past it, I still tried to take a picture of it -- and it didn't turn out half bad!

Vimy Ridge

We had to go through security again to get onto the ferry, much like we did when we first entered mainland Europe. On the ferry I had a few bloomers and watched the remaining Japanese tour members try fish-and-chips for the first time. After, I went onto the deck and took some pictures of the Cliffs of Dover, something I tried to do the first time but failed because of the fog.

Cliffs of Dover Cliffs of Dover

We arrived in London and all decided to go out for supper together around 7. It was Flip's idea, actually, although she won't be joining us. We learned at this time that her real name wasn't Flip either: it was Jannelle. And Muffin? Roan.

When we arrived at the Royal National Hotel a tour representative came onto the coach. She told us that the meeting spot that was under repair when we left on our tour, was now open for business and we could go there to get discounts to go around the city and for a tour of Stonehenge.

I got my luggage, and after saying goodbye and hugging those who weren't coming to supper, I walked down the street, turned the corner and didn't see many of the tour members ever again.

I got to the Imperial, checked in and went to my room. I'm so used to staying in different hotels every night that it seems weird I'll be spending three nights in the same bed.

Well, 7 is approaching now and I have to get ready for dinner. I feel awful for missing last-nights at O'Sullivans, although from what I heard, had I gotten up at 2 instead of going back to sleep, and headed down the street, they would have still been there.

I'll talk to you later.


So ends the tour. I met up with my fellow travelers outside the Royal National Hotel and we walked down the street to Nando's and had chicken with different levels of spicy sauce on it. I had the less-hot one, but Tom had an extremely-hot one and we all watched his face become a dark shade of red and tears roll down his cheeks. I also had a bottomless coke for £2.25, which is pretty reasonable! The meal was really good, but I only recommend it for people who like spicy food.

After dinner, we walked down the street and went to The Marquis Cornwallis, a bar with a really fancy name. The bar was a very happening place. There were people on both floors, and outside on the street, all dancing and drinking. I didn't check out the alcohol but judging by the regular beer, raspberry beer, apple cider and sprite at the table, the bar sold many types of drinks. We sat around for a couple hours and discussed out favorite city on the trip and what we planned to do once we got back home. Flip said the feelings we were all experiencing was called "Post-Contiki Depression" which is a feeling of dread towards going back to our boring 9-5 lives. Speaking of Flip, both her and Muffin came to the bar. They said they have a 10-day vacation between tours and were thinking of going to France during it.

Around 9:30 I grew tired of the noise and drinking so I said goodbye to the group of people with hugs and handshakes from all around and I left with just a single glance back.

I was a bit lonely knowing I was on my own again so I called my parents when I got back to the hotel. It cheered me up a bit. It's sad to know that you may never see the people who you just spent two weeks with ever again.

And thus, so ends my journey with the tour group. Of course, I'll still record tomorrow's events around London and the next day's plane-ride home, but my Contiki trip around Europe has come to an end. If you have read all of this, thank you for your time. I hope I inspired and entertained you with my stories. Thank you for traveling with me.

I hope I do something exciting tomorrow to end my trip off with a bang, instead of a tearful goodbye, but for now, I am exhausted and may just sleep.

Goodnight Journal. Tomorrow may be boring, but it could also be an exciting trip to Stonehenge too! Only time will tell!


And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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