Puebla Mexico: A Photo Essay

Puebla Mexico: A Photo Essay

March 9, 2017 · 2 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

My past few articles have covered some pretty heavy subjects, ranging from eating dog tacos, to an island full of haunted dolls and to the ruins of one of Mesoamerica's greatest cities. To lighten the mood a little, I decided to put together a photo essay of the beautiful city of Puebla.

Puebla is much smaller than Mexico City so it isn't as noisy, it isn't as rushed and it's much more walkable. While there are still 1.4 million people living here, it doesn't feel that way. To be honest, if I was to choose between Mexico City or Pubela to revisit, I would probably choose Puebla.

Puebla is known worldwide for its colourful buildings, narrow streets and hundreds upon hundreds of churches. I was told by one gentlemen that there are 365 churches in the city – one for each day of the year – but when I told another gentlemen that, he looked at me surprised and asked "Is that all?"

It is no surprise then that this city is nicknamed "The Angelópolis" or "The City of Angels".

The main reason I visited Puebla was to attend a wedding, so sightseeing wasn't my main priority. With that being said, I did manage to sneak away for a couple hours and take some pictures. While the city is beautiful itself, the area around it is also volcanic and full of ancient ruins, so I could easily spend a week here alone.

This photo essay includes pictures of the Puebla Cathedral, The Church of San Agustín, Paseo Bravo and the surrounding area. 

Puebla Cathedral Puebla Cathedral Puebla Cathedral Fonda Resturant Hotel in Puebla Orange Door in Puebla The Church of San Agustín outside The Church of San Agustín inside The Church of San Agustín dome The Church of San Agustín inside The Church of San Agustín outside Tall building in Puebla Shorter building in Puebla Pretty building in Puebla Church in Puebla Brave Walk / Paseo Bravo Brave Walk / Paseo Bravo Front of fountain on the Brave Walk Back of fountain on the Brave Walk Street in Puebla Street in Puebla Street Food in Puebla Street Food in Puebla Cobbelstone Street in Puebla Fabio Angel Wallart in Puebla Girl in Puebla

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Puebla Mexico: A Photo Essay

My past few articles have covered some pretty heavy subjects, ranging from eating dog tacos, to an island full of haunted dolls and to the ruins of one of Mesoamerica's greatest cities. To lighten the mood a little, I decided to put together a photo essay of the beautiful city of Puebla.

Puebla is much smaller than Mexico City so it isn't as noisy, it isn't as rushed and it's much more walkable. While there are still 1.4 million people living here, it doesn't feel that way. To be honest, if I was to choose between Mexico City or Pubela to revisit, I would probably choose Puebla.

Puebla is known worldwide for its colourful buildings, narrow streets and hundreds upon hundreds of churches. I was told by one gentlemen that there are 365 churches in the city – one for each day of the year – but when I told another gentlemen that, he looked at me surprised and asked "Is that all?"

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