Madrid Food Tour

Madrid Food Tour January 14, 2016 · 10 min. readDisclaimer: This article may contain affiliate links.

The following is a guest article by Sally Elbassir, the owner and food taster of Passport and Plates, originally titled "The Tapas, Taverns and History of Madrid: A Food Tour". Be sure to drop by her blog for culinary treats from around the world!

I've always been a foodie. Long before the term "foodie" ever existed, I was that kid who was always eager to try something new.

Things haven't changed much in the last couple of decades. My palate has expanded, and I discovered that my dream job does exist; it just happens to be occupied by Anthony Bourdain. Now I satisfy my foodie obsession by writing on Yelp, and on my blog... there's plenty more where that came from.

I'd always wanted to go on a food tour, but being the budget traveler that I am, could never justify paying for it. Luckily, I left for my first solo trip not long after my birthday, and my parents decided to treat me to a belated birthday present. Thanks, Mom and Dad!

So that's how I found myself standing in Plaza Isabel II at 6:30 pm in the middle of August, ready to embark on a Madrid Food Tour titled "Tapas, Taverns, and History." We were a fun yet eclectic bunch: a Canadian family of four, an American girl living in Germany, an older French woman, and of course, our lovely tour guide Luke!

Since I don't eat pork or drink alcohol, I was intrigued to see how my dietary restrictions would be accommodated, especially in the land of vino and jamón. They did an excellent job of offering me equally delicious modifications.

What I loved most about the tour was its informality. I felt like I was spending the evening following a knowledgeable Madrileño friend around the city, albeit one who is as passionate about eating as I am. That evening, I was a Madrileña.

And now without further ado: tapas, taverns, and history.

Our meeting spot was in the middle of a touristy plaza, so imagine my surprise when our first stop was a mere 300 feet away at Taberna Real. Here I munched on marinated olives, homemade potato chips, pa amb tomàquet (Catalan tomato toast) and tosta de atún con pimientos rojos (tuna toast with red peppers). We were off to a good start.

Stop #1 - Passports and Plates Taberna Real - Passports and Plates Marinatedo Olives - Passports and Plates Tuna with peppers - Passports and Plates

Fun fact: tapas in Spain refer to the small food bites that you get for free when you order alcoholic drinks. The more drinks you order, the "nicer" the tapas become. The idea originated long ago in Andalusia, when a waiter covered the king's wine glass with a piece of ham to keep bugs away. He liked the idea so much that he implemented the idea of serving a free "tapa" (or "top" in English) with all alcoholic drinks in Spain. And thus, the tapa was born! Tapas are not always free (it depends on the city), and portion sizes can vary significantly.

Another fun fact: in Madrid, once you finish with an olive (or with your smaller trash in general), you toss the pit on the floor in front of the bar. The dirtier the bar, the more popular it is. Back in the day, competing bars used to send employees to steal trash from Taberna Real to make their bars seem more popular. Sneaky, sneaky.

On our way to the next stop, we walked by the Palacio Real and Plaza de la Villa, where we learned about the tumultuous and incestuous history of the Spanish royal family. Talk about drama! Luke was filled with knowledge and fun tidbits about the city and its history, and he did a great job of covering both food and culture.

Our second stop was Bodegas Ricla, a small mom-and-pop shop I would have never thought to visit. We started with boquerones en vinagre (white anchovies in vinegar), which were deliciously citrusy and significantly less fishy than their standard brown counterparts – almost like a ceviche, in fact. All the ingredients were purchased from the market that day, and this was clearly evidenced by the fresh taste. Accompanying the fish was mosto (grape juice) for me, tostas de cabrales (toast with cooked Asturian blue cheese), and albondigas (beef meatballs). Apparently the meatballs are a secret menu item. The shop owner buys a limited amount of beef at the market so you have to know and ask for them. Definitely felt like a bit of an insider.

Anchovies in vinegar - Passports and Plates Anchovies and mosto - Passports and Plates Toast with blue cheese - Passports and Plates Meatballs – a secret menu item! - Passports and Plates

At this point, my stomach was doing a happy dance as we followed Luke to our next stop called Meson del Champiñon aka the house of mushrooms. On the way, we passed both Mercado San Miguel (a slightly overpriced foodie market) and the world's oldest restaurant, Sobrino de Botin (insider tip: apparently it's expensive with mediocre food). The mushrooms we ate were heavenly. I'm quite ambivalent towards mushrooms and don't generally understand the fuss, but these were bursting with flavors of spices, herbs, and butter. Perfection. Luke was in the middle of telling us that this restaurant was featured on a famous Asian food show when a group of Korean tourists flooded the bar – the timing couldn't have been better.

In case you can't tell, mushrooms and peppers are popular here - Passports and Plates The best mushrooms I’ve ever had - Passports and Plates

Next we passed through the famous Plaza Mayor for a short history lesson and a warning – never eat at a restaurant here! Not only is the food terrible, but it's also ridiculously overpriced. Instead, we continued to El Abuelo, a small bar specializing in gambónes al ajillo (shrimp with garlic). This, my friends, is sizzling shrimp with caramelized garlic drowned in an herby olive oil. It tastes just as amazing as it sounds.

Prep time! - Passports and Plates Fresh and sizzling - Passports and Plates

For our last stop, we walked through a beautifully lit Plaza de Santa Ana over to the restaurant where we were having a sit-down dinner. Yes, we had dinner after all that eating. Totally got our money's worth!

Plaza de Santa Ana at night - Passports and Plates

The restaurant, Casa Toni, had a table ready for us upstairs. Suddenly, just as we were starting to get food, one of the men on the tour spilled his entire glass of red wine on me. D'oh! Luckily I managed to get the wine out of my clothes, but I unfortunately missed my opportunity to take good food pictures. I did link recipes and wiki articles for visuals, though.

The storefront of Casa Toni - Passports and Plates

We ate a huge variety of food including patatas bravas (fried potatoes), spiced tomatoes, a shrimp and pepper omelet and lamb sweetbreads. Can I just say that I've never had sweetbreads before and was extremely impressed by how good they were? To end the meal, we were presented with secret cookies baked by cloistered nuns. It was the perfect conclusion to an amazing tour. Food inevitably creates bonds, and our group parted ways just a little more in love with Madrid and its food and culture. Special thanks to Luke, who was a knowledgeable and passionate tour guide.

Our tour group at dinner - Passports and Plates

For those of you who write off Madrid as "just another city," or who think tapas are simply small plates, think again. While Madrid may not be where the tapas sensation started, the culture of shared plates amongst friends is alive and kicking. Go out and explore, and you may just find that an unassuming tavern is actually home to some of the best food in town.

For a self-guided version, check out this list by the owner of Madrid Food Tours and this list of typical Spanish tapas.

Don't forget to pin it!

Madrid Foot Tour - Passports and Plates

Like what you see?

Then sign up for more!

You might also enjoy

Journey to Castle Butte & Stonehenge

Stonehenge, Saskatchewan, is just a little over two hours southwest of Regina, just past the town of Assiniboia. I've explored this area of the province before on previous trips, but I've never been to Stonehenge. In fact, my journey started out as a trip to Castle Butte, but after seeing a nearby marker for Stonehenge on a map, that quickly became my primary destination.

I've driven this area a few times looking for abandoned buildings. Normally I'd keep an eye out for them, but I knew most of them were a little further south. Before I got that far, I took the turn off to Ogema.

From Ogema I drove down Highway 13 and turned right before the ghost of Horizon. I took the train through this area a few summers back with Jessica, but it looked substantially different being covered in ice and now.  

Read More

Exploring Canada's Most Haunted City

As I stood in the courtyard of Fort Henry, I heard screams emanating from within. Fort Henry was constructed to protect the Kingston Royal Dockyard from the invading American forces during the War of 1812. The threat was so real that the capital of Canada – which was then Kingston – was moved to Quebec to protect it. The docks are all that stood between the United States and the St. Lawrence River and both countries were all too familiar with how easily it would turn the tides of battle.

As the screams from inside Fort Henry faded, I turned to the man beside me. He had come with his family. We got talking, trying to calm our nerves as bloodied clowns and undead mimes began wandering out from inside the fort.

"What brings you to Kingston?" he asked.

Read More

What To Do in Historic Philadelphia

A few months ago I entered a contest for a trip for two to visit Philadelphia on Two Bad Tourists. Normally contests like this are limited to United States residents so when I saw this one was open to Canadians I jumped at the chance. I've never won something like this before, so I actually forgot about it until I got the emailing saying I had won. Two Bad Tourists then worked alongside Visit Philly to organise the trip for me and my mother to explore Philadelphia for three days. Visit Philly paid for our flights, hotels and gave us a VIP Pass to experience the city to our heart's content. It is thanks to them that this trip is possible.

Several movies and television shows have tried to capture the essence of Philadelphia over the years – from the boxing Blockbuster Rocky, to the paranormal thriller The Sixth Sense, to It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia and even Boy Meets World – but each described the city differently. There is no easy way to approach a city as dynamic as The City of Brotherly Love. With countless layers of art, history, religion and the paranormal, Philadelphia is a city unlike any other throughout the United States. 

One thing that surprised me the most about Philadelphia was the history. The city was founded and designed by William Penn, who is also the state of Pennsylvania's namesake. Born in London, England in 1644 he lived through The Great Fire of 1666 and The Great Plague of London from 1665-1666. Both events shaped Penn's life so he designed the city to be strictly stone buildings (to stop fires from spreading) and to have plenty of space between the buildings (as to prevent illness from spreading). This led to the older areas of the city to have winding corridors between old stone walls.

Read More