Learning to Chalk at the Sunshine Chalk Art Festival

Learning to Chalk at the Sunshine Chalk Art Festival July 5, 2017 · 2 min. readDisclaimer: While the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

Kristine Ens started with a simple black rectangle. When asked, she said the black helped brighter colours pop, and the base allowed for a smoother chalking surface. As I knew nothing about chalking, I nodded my head and let her work. In just over sixty minutes, Ens transformed that black box into a blue-eyed crow and surrounded it with an earthly green light.

I was very impressed, to say the least.

Chalk art for Sunshine Chalk Art Festival Kristine Ens starts chalk art crow Kristine Ens working on chalk art crow Kristine Ens finished chalk art crow

Ens has been chalking for three years and debuted in the first ever Medicine Hat Sunshine Chalk Art Festival in 2014. Since it began, 100 artists from across North America have made their annual pilgrimage to the festival which runs this year from August 11th – 13th.

Due to Medicine Hat's dry climate and 330 days of sunshine per year, this city quickly became one of the best places in Canada to chalk. Although still young, this festival brings in thousands of people each year, prompting the closure of several streets and giving artists the opportunity and space to showcase their talents.

For the children and novice chalkers out there, chalk and chalking lessons are provided for free, allowing people of any age or skill level to take part in the fun.

Selfie with Kristine and me

For more information about the Medicine Hat Sunshine Chalk Art Festival and what to expect there, visit FestivalSeekers.com.

For a list of other great things to see in and around Medicine Hat, drop by their website and get planning now!

Don't forget to pin it!

Learning to Chalk at the Sunshine Chalk Art Festival Learning to Chalk at the Sunshine Chalk Art Festival

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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