July 10 Update

July 10 Update July 10, 2015 · 4 min. read

Welcome to another monthly recap!

June was a slow month for my blog. I only managed to push out three articles all last month: Destination: Halifax, an article about this beautiful Nova Scotian city; The Saskatchewan Military Museum and its incredible collection of war relics, weapons and medals; and Montreal's Thousand Steeples, an article about the many secrets found throughout the streets of Montreal.

While there are many reasons for my lack of articles this month (including my recent addiction to Game of Thrones -- is winter ever going to arrive!?), the most prominent reason is because I took a vacation. I wanted to go somewhere new, but wanted to go somewhere that wouldn't be too expensive. Montreal, New Orleans and Rio de Janeiro were all options, but once I saw the beautiful Notre Dame in Montreal, my decision was made.

For the first time since I began traveling, I decided to chronicle my trip on social media. It went fairly successful. Other bloggers do this so I thought I would give it a try. I took pictures of places I saw, gave reviews of restaurants and snapped videos of my journeys throughout the winding streets of Montreal and Quebec City. Both cities were incredible, but I was the most surprised by Quebec City, and just how beautiful it really was! While my time in Montreal was very muggy and hot, and I was feeling like my vacation would have been better had I just stayed home, Quebec City changed all of that and made the whole trip worthwhile.

Backtracking a bit, last month also brought out my very first newsletter! It went to all 9 recipients and I heard nothing but positive feedback. I'll have to start promoting my newsletter more, as I was told it's one of the best ways to get more traffic and keep people interested in my blog. I might even consider doing a newsletter post with every blog post.

Speaking of traffic, due to my minimal blog articles and week-long vacation, my blog saw very little traffic last month. June 1st to June 10th (10 days) saw 4,799 people. June 10th to July 10th (30 days) saw 1,154 people. Ouch.

I plan to write more articles this month, and hopefully regain some of my lost followers. In fact, while June kind of sucked for traffic, I have a feeling July will be much different. I have several articles in the work as I write this and will cover everything from religion to politics to censorship. Yes, I too have felt the muffling of censorship, and it's about time I talked about it!

I also have a very much awaited "Liebster Award" I won several months ago that I need to do. And, of course, I have to write more about my trip to French Canada!

As I write this, my fingers twitch to write another, so I will bid you adieu.

As always, keep on traveling!


And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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