Journey to Spookytown

Journey to Spookytown October 19, 2018 · 5 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

Imagine a town full of zombies, ghouls, ghosts and spooks, all living in harmony. It's tough to wrap your head around (unless your name is Linda Blair) but that's exactly what you'll find in Spookytown – a miniature Halloween village, created by Jessica Nuttall.

Jessica Nuttall Spookytown Spookytown Spookytown

Spookytown began in 2004 with the purchase of Castle Blackstone. This towering fortress began a 14+ year passion to build a community for the living, dead and undead to coexist together. After Castle Blackstone came the construction of the cemetery, the business district and then the "spooky" end of town, which holds the magnificent Victorian Mansion. The town includes hotels, cathedrals, restaurants, cafes, museums and a grain elevator. The town is like any other small town during the day – quiet, peaceful and relatively pleasant, but once night falls, Spookytown becomes a creepy village full of flashing lights, blood curdling screams and eerie music.

Grave Grave Grave Grain elevator Halloween crow

When asked about the population of Spookytown, Nuttall answered "Dead or alive?", followed by a mischievous smile. A quick headcount found about 75 spooks hidden among the village's dozen buildings, but that might not include the ones living in the buildings or sleeping within their coffins.

Frankenstein's Monster Ghost Grandma Grim Reaper Spooky cave

Spookytown's buildings come from two main miniature architectural companies: Lemax and Department 56. These buildings are purchased at a variety of places, such as Michael's stores, or Spirit of Christmas in Banff, Alberta.

When asked what part of the village she would live in if she could, Nuttall showed me The Happy Halloween Cat House, which is located outside of the main townsite. This house is a small, cozy building with a haunted church next door and a yard full of bright orange and red leaves and the occasional headstone. Nuttall said she would like to live here because it reminds her of her childhood home and "because of the cats".

Happy Halloween Cat House Spookytown

Last year Nuttall entered the Lemax 2017 Video Contest, where contestants from around North America submitted videos to show off their Lemax Halloween villages. Nuttall approached the contest differently than most and submitted a video letting the village explain itself through snapshots of daily rural life. Instead of explaining each piece, she let the ambient music, flashing lights and moving figurines speak for her. Due to her creatively done video, she won the contest and was awarded over 20 new pieces to add to the village, including Wanda's Cupcakes, Reaper's Landing and the Dead Fraternity – a frat house inhabited with zombies.

Like any community, the town has a wide range of citizens, but Nuttall's favourite two are the "two old ladies" that spend time near the gazebo in the middle of the town. They fit in well and are "hilarious", although Nuttall never would explain why.

Two old ladies Mummy's Alive Phantom of the Opera

Spookytown has gone through a lot of transformations over the years, but the next year will see some drastic changes. Now that the population is increasing, and infrastructure is starting to take shape, Nuttall plans to turn the village into a proper town by adding more roads, trees and enhancing the surrounding landscape. With a surplus of buildings, she's also planning to expand into smaller townsites, like The Happy Halloween Cat House.

View from porch Witches

If you visit Spookytown, however, one of the things you'll notice after the village are the three, five-foot-tall skeletons sitting around the village like undead overseers. These skeletons are having a dinner party next to the village, with plates full of fingers and scooped out eyeballs. These skeletons are a new addition to the village and was meant to the replace the village for the first time in over a decade. However, Nuttall decided to mix the two and create one of her spookiest creations yet.

Plate of fingers Crow with skeletons Halloween display

Spookytown, the surrounding skeletons and all the other Halloween decorations throughout the house – and there are many – are taken down the second week of November. "Some people," Nuttall says, "leave them up all year. I don't though. I'm not that crazy."

Skeletons Skeletons Skeletons Multiple Skeletons

Although Lemax isn't putting on another video contest this year, Nuttall decided to create another video about Spookytown, this time focusing around "Robert Zombie."

Visitation to Spookytown is by invitation only, but if you're looking to purchase your own items and start your own Halloween village, I'd recommend Department 56's Harley Davidson Crow Bar Light House, Toads and Frogs Witchcraft Haunted House, or Lemax's Ice Cream Shop.

Jessica Nuttall

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Journey to Spookytown Journey to Spookytown

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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Journey to Spookytown

Imagine a town full of zombies, ghouls, ghosts and spooks, all living in harmony. It's tough to wrap your head around (unless your name is Linda Blair) but that's exactly what you'll find in Spookytown – a miniature Halloween village, created by Jessica Nuttall.

Spookytown began in 2004 with the purchase of Castle Blackstone. This towering fortress began a 14+ year passion to build a community for the living, dead and undead to coexist together. After Castle Blackstone came the construction of the cemetery, the business district and then the "spooky" end of town, which holds the magnificent Victorian Mansion. The town includes hotels, cathedrals, restaurants, cafes, museums and a grain elevator. The town is like any other small town during the day – quiet, peaceful and relatively pleasant, but once night falls, Spookytown becomes a creepy village full of flashing lights, blood curdling screams and eerie music.

When asked about the population of Spookytown, Nuttall answered "Dead or alive?", followed by a mischievous smile. A quick headcount found about 75 spooks hidden among the village's dozen buildings, but that might not include the ones living in the buildings or sleeping within their coffins.

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