Instagramming Canada - Quebec

Instagramming Canada - Quebec October 13, 2015 · 2 min. readDisclaimer: This article may contain affiliate links.

I had the incredible opportunity of visiting Quebec for the first time this summer, and it stole my heart away. I've seen many of the provinces and territories across Canada, but there's just something special about Quebec.

To me, Quebec is a province locked in time. Montreal is futuristic, with expansive bridges, modern art, postmodern architecture and has the title of being where John Lennon and Yoko Ono staged their "Bed In For Peace". Quebec City, on the other hand, is old fashioned, remarkably European with French styled architecture, has old cobblestone roads and a massive murals. The contrast between the two cities is so incredible that I actually considered splitting this article into two sections, one about Montreal and one about Quebec.

However, I decided to just remind my dear readers that if they want to read more about my time in Quebec, I have an article about Montreal's 1000 Steeples and one about the gorgeously haunted city of Quebec.

Quebec is unique to Canada as it's the only province where French is the native language. Canada is supposedly bilingual, but the only bilingual province is New Brunswick. Although Quebec is strictly French, I had no trouble getting around because everybody I met spoke fluent English.

Quebec has had it's challenges over the years, from struggling with the Aboriginals, to being bombed and destroyed by the British, by having a rebellion (or "Patriots' War", depending who you ask), by being plagued with extreme separatism and having to be invaded by the Canadian military, by having the Oka Crisis and finally by almost separating Canada with their famous 49-51% vote. Quebec is the province of Canada that is most proud of who they are and their heritage, and it is something uniquely refreshing about the province when you compare it to Western Canada which has a very recent history and whose heritage is lucky to go back more than a century, let alone almost four.

Being said, I would like to introduce you to "Instagramming Canada Quebec", and the 9th installment of my 13 part series about Canada. Hope you enjoy it!

City Life

City LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity Life

Old Quebec

Old QuebecOld QuebecOld QuebecOld QuebecOld QuebecOld QuebecOld QuebecOld QuebecOld Quebec

Fairmont Frontenac

Fairmont FrontenacFairmont FrontenacFairmont FrontenacFairmont FrontenacFairmont Frontenac

Mother Nature

Mother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother Nature

Lakes and Rivers

Lakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and Rivers

Northern Quebec

Northern QuebecNorthern QuebecNorthern QuebecNorthern QuebecNorthern QuebecNorthern QuebecNorthern Quebec

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.


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