Instagramming Canada - Ontario

Instagramming Canada - Ontario October 9, 2015 · 2 min. read

Ontario doesn't need an introduction. Internationally, it's known for the Great Lakes, Niagara Falls and the CN Tower. Nationally, it is known for its politics. It's home to Canada's largest city (Toronto) and Canada's capital city (Ottawa).

However, Ontario's role on the national and international stage stretches much further back than Confederation in 1867. A century before, in 1788, Ontario was under control of the Province of Quebec and was split into four sections. The divisions continued over the next fifty years, and by 1838 Ontario was divided into twenty sections! In 1867, when Canada first became a country, Ontario's borders with the newly acquired "Rupert's Land" came into question. Over the next 40 years there would be many adjustments due to the creation and expansions of new provinces (Manitoba, Quebec) and the adjusting of borders because of conflicts (the Red River Rebellion).

Today, Ontario is split unofficially into two sections: southern Ontario and northern Ontario. The reason for this division is because of the vast geographical differences between the the two. The Great Lakes in southern Ontario help keep the area warm in the winter and are responsible for its summer growing season. Northern Ontario has much less water, and is thus much dryer, creating very long, very cold winters. The majority of Ontario's population lives around the Great Lakes, while a very small minority of people live in northern Ontario.

Ontario has been that province I've had to visit several times during stop-over flights to other destinations, but not one that I've ever visited for fun. However, Ontario is Canada's most popular province for vacationers and tourists, so there is definitely plenty to see there! I've been following several bloggers from Ontario and they have really helped change my opinion of the province, so I too would like to visit it one day! Have you ever been?

A huge thank-you to and1online for the usage of his picture as my cover image. Be sure to give him a follow for more amazing Ontario pictures!

I hope you enjoy part 8 of 13, "Instagramming Canada - Ontario"!

City Life

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Architecture

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Small Town Life

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Northern Life

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Algonquin Provincial Park

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Mother Nature

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Lakes and Rivers

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And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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