Instagramming Canada - Nunavut

Instagramming Canada - Nunavut October 1, 2015 · 3 min. read

I want to begin this entry by talking a little bit about the sheer size of Nunavut. As I have said in other articles, Canada is the second largest country in the world. However, what I didn't know until writing this article was that because Nunavut is also so large, it is the center of Canada! Nunavut is so big that it is the size of British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan combined. If you're not Canadian and that doesn't mean much to you, Nunavut is the size of the UK, France, Spain, Germany, Italy and Poland combined.

And it is only inhabited by 32,000 people. That's right, only 32 thousand people!

Being that far north, parts of Nunavut have six months of straight daylight, and six (very long, very cold) months of straight night. The communities are very small, and abandoned towns are sadly very frequent. There are also ships frozen in the waters, ranging from Swedish viking ships to modern tankers. The thick ice is impossible to pass, even with climate change. As you can see in the pictures below, people can cross the ice from Baffin Island to Greenland (which often made it difficult for me to figure out where exactly the picture was taken).

Also, being that far north, and this late in the year, winter has already set in. I should have thought of doing this cross Canada series during the summer when I didn't have to worry about winter, but I can't stop now and resume it once the winter is over, so to my foreign readers, let this be your taste of what Canadian winter is like. Hopefully I can chew through the remaining 7 provinces before winter reaches the rest of Canada.

Because there aren't as many people living in northern Canada, tourism isn't very popular and I didn't want all my pictures to be of snow, so some of the following photos have been taken awhile ago. I hope that's alright. Either way, I hope you enjoy "Instagramming Canada - Nunavut", and I hope one day you get to visit this place for yourself.

I would also like to thank Finding True North for the splash image I'm using. They are one of the leading groups promoting Nunavut tourism, and have even recently put on their very own Instameet. Be sure to check out their page and give them a "Follow" for more amazing Nunavut pictures! They're awesome!

Northern Life

Northern LifeNorthern LifeNorthern LifeNorthern LifeNorthern LifeNorthern Life

Auyuittuq National Park

Auyuittuq National ParkAuyuittuq National ParkAuyuittuq National ParkAuyuittuq National ParkAuyuittuq National ParkAuyuittuq National Park

Baffin Island

Baffin IslandBaffin IslandBaffin IslandBaffin IslandBaffin Island

Mother Nature

Mother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother Nature

Lakes and Rivers

Lakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and Rivers

Snow & Ice

Snow & IceSnow & IceSnow & IceSnow & IceSnow & IceSnow & Ice

Winter

WinterWinterWinterWinterWinterWinter

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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