Instagramming Canada - Nova Scotia

Instagramming Canada - Nova Scotia October 19, 2015 · 2 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

Approaching the end of Grade 12, I told my mother I didn't want to go to graduation. Instead, I said, I wanted to go to the Canadian Maritimes. I had been to BC, Alberta, AND Manitoba and soon would be going to Ontario, but I had never been to Atlantic Canada. So, instead of having a big grad party, my mother and I took an unforgettable trip to the East Coast.

After a long flight (that's a story for another time) we arrived in Halifax and drove down to Peggy's Cove. On our way there I realized I wasn't in Saskatchewan anymore! The ground was red and fertile, the grass was a powerful emerald, and the Atlantic shoreline was the purest white. Halifax was beautiful, and so historical that I even wrote an article all about it. In that article I talked about the incredible history of this area, from things such as the devastating Halifax Explosion that flattened the city, the tragedy of Swissair Flight 111 and the final resting place of hundreds of victims of the RMS Titanic.

But Halifax, and Nova Scotia, isn't all doom and gloom. It has the Cabot Trail, Canada's most scenic highway (weather pending), the isolated horse island of Sable Island, many quirky, colorful houses, gorgeous universities and an small town charm that is unforgettable. Blessed with some of the best lobster in the country (the first time I ever saw a McLobster was in Nova Scotia), and brimming with scores of fish, crabs and oysters, this province is the complete opposite of the place I call home... and I loved every bit of it!

With that, I would like to welcome you to Canada's Ocean Playground in "Instagramming Canada - Nova Scotia"!

City Life

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Maritime Life

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Cabot Trail and Cape Breton Island

Cabot Trail and Cape Breton IslandCabot Trail and Cape Breton IslandCabot Trail and Cape Breton IslandCabot Trail and Cape Breton IslandCabot Trail and Cape Breton IslandCabot Trail and Cape Breton Island

Peggy's Cove

Peggy's CovePeggy's CovePeggy's CovePeggy's CovePeggy's Cove

Mother Nature

Mother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother Nature

Ocean and Water

Ocean and WaterOcean and WaterOcean and WaterOcean and WaterOcean and WaterOcean and Water

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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