Instagramming Canada - New Brunswick

Instagramming Canada - New Brunswick October 17, 2015 · 2 min. read

In 2010 my mother and I took a trek out to the Maritimes to see the Eastern Canada. We started in Nova Scotia, went up to PEI and then wanted to go to New Brunswick. Unfortunately, we ran out of time and were only able to take a few pictures at the border before heading back to Halifax. We were both really disappointed as we really wanted to see more of New Brunswick.

Of the 13 provinces and territories, New Brunswick is the 11th smallest while its neighbor to the West, Quebec, is the 2nd bigger. The two provinces are drastically different in many ways, but share one common trait: French is spoken fluently in both of them. In fact, New Brunswick is the only official bilingual province in Canada which made searching for pictures on Instagram that much more complicated.

Europeans possibly touched New Brunswick over a thousand years ago when the Norse Vikings were exploring Canada's coastline, but the first permanent European visitor arrived in 1534. The area has been inhabited ever since! To put that in perspective, Queen Elizabeth I was one year old, and Anne Boleyn had yet to be executed. Canada itself wouldn't become a country for another 333 years!

Although New Brunswick has been settled for nearly 500 years, it still retains a fairly small population of only 750,000 people. This makes it not only the 11th smallest province, but the 8th smallest in population, 2 spots below my home province of Saskatchewan.

New Brunswick is known worldwide for its stunning Bay of Fundy and Hopewell Rocks, but there is much more to this gorgeous province than just that! Unfortunately I couldn't find as many architectural images as I had hoped, but I guess that's just the universes' way of telling me I have to go back and take my own pictures!

With that, I'd like to introduce you to "Instagramming Canada - New Brunswick"!

I would also like to thank Sid Naidu, a visual storyteller from Toronto for this amazing picture. His images are incredible, so be sure to give his Instagram a follow!

City Life

City LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity Life

Architecture

ArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitecture

Bay of Fundy and Hopewell Rocks

Bay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell Rocks

Mother Nature

Mother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother Nature

Lakes and Rivers

Lakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and Rivers

Sky

SkySkySkySkySky

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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