Instagramming Canada - New Brunswick

Instagramming Canada - New Brunswick October 17, 2015 · 2 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

In 2010 my mother and I took a trek out to the Maritimes to see the Eastern Canada. We started in Nova Scotia, went up to PEI and then wanted to go to New Brunswick. Unfortunately, we ran out of time and were only able to take a few pictures at the border before heading back to Halifax. We were both really disappointed as we really wanted to see more of New Brunswick.

Of the 13 provinces and territories, New Brunswick is the 11th smallest while its neighbor to the West, Quebec, is the 2nd bigger. The two provinces are drastically different in many ways, but share one common trait: French is spoken fluently in both of them. In fact, New Brunswick is the only official bilingual province in Canada which made searching for pictures on Instagram that much more complicated.

Europeans possibly touched New Brunswick over a thousand years ago when the Norse Vikings were exploring Canada's coastline, but the first permanent European visitor arrived in 1534. The area has been inhabited ever since! To put that in perspective, Queen Elizabeth I was one year old, and Anne Boleyn had yet to be executed. Canada itself wouldn't become a country for another 333 years!

Although New Brunswick has been settled for nearly 500 years, it still retains a fairly small population of only 750,000 people. This makes it not only the 11th smallest province, but the 8th smallest in population, 2 spots below my home province of Saskatchewan.

New Brunswick is known worldwide for its stunning Bay of Fundy and Hopewell Rocks, but there is much more to this gorgeous province than just that! Unfortunately I couldn't find as many architectural images as I had hoped, but I guess that's just the universes' way of telling me I have to go back and take my own pictures!

With that, I'd like to introduce you to "Instagramming Canada - New Brunswick"!

I would also like to thank Sid Naidu, a visual storyteller from Toronto for this amazing picture. His images are incredible, so be sure to give his Instagram a follow!

City Life

City LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity Life

Architecture

ArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitectureArchitecture

Bay of Fundy and Hopewell Rocks

Bay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell RocksBay of Fundy and Hopewell Rocks

Mother Nature

Mother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother NatureMother Nature

Lakes and Rivers

Lakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and Rivers

Sky

SkySkySkySkySky

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

Books I Recommend


Sign up for a list of
100+ Things to do in Regina!

You might also enjoy

What Makes Downtown Regina So Cool

Throughout the past few months I've been sharing a lot about downtown Regina, and there's a reason for that. Downtown Regina's urban centre has undergone a massive revitalization the past few years, and since I love Regina, I felt it was important for me to talk about this. For those who don't travel downtown regularly, you'd be surprised to find out it is no longer the downtown of the 1990s. A lot has changed, is changing, or has been completely transformed.

Scores of people had to come together to make this happen, but one of the driving forces behind this transformation is the Regina Downtown Business Improvement District (RDBID). This organisation was established in 1981 under the belief that entrepreneurs, diversity and creativity should thrive in the hub of the city. It may have taken time, but after decades of work their efforts are finally being rewarded. Today, downtown Regina is the epicentre of festivals, vendors, concerts, movies, art displays, and outdoor activities. This winter the RDBID lit the Christmas tree downtown, has been operating the skating rink twice a day everyday, and helped to arrange the crokicurl rink – the new sport that is sweeping the nation. 

In the summer the list gets even longer – thanks to many partners and sponsors – with the Regina Farmers Market, Market Under the Stars, Cinema Under the Stars, AfroFest, Doors Open, Yoga in the Park, art {outside}, Parkin(ing) Day, Pop Up Downtown and dozens of other events and festivals.

Read More

150 Facts About Canada

Although the hot summer days of July are long behind us, 2017 is still Canada's 150th year. In honour of Canada's sesquicentennial birthday, I decided to put together a list of 150 things about Canada. This list talks about our quirkiness, our strengths, our weakness, and our legacy, for better and for worse. There are some sad facts, some odd facts and some facts that will probably make you open another tab to look into for yourself.

Hope you enjoy this list, and I hope you all had a great 2017!

1. Canada's two official languages are French and English, but only 20.6% of Canadians speak French.

Read More

Has My Opinion on Innsbruck Changed?

Long before I started my blog, many, many years ago, I visited Innsbruck, Austria. I was on a Contiki trip through Europe and visited a plethora of locations such as Rome, Paris, Amsterdam, Venice, Lucerne and Innsbruck, just to name a few. It was an incredible experience and one that I think was a transformative moment in my life.

Off the record (or, on the record now, I guess), of all the places I visited, the only one I didn't like was Innsbruck. I couldn't get into it. We visited it in late March, so the weather wasn't the best. The trees didn't have any leaves on them, the grass was brown, and everything had a post-winter grey look to it. After visiting Munich and spending the night in St. Goar, my mind wasn't thinking about Innsbruck at all. Instead, I was more excited to go to Venice the next day, and the Vatican the day after that. My time in Innsbruck was uneventful, and all I wanted was to get back on the road.

That was in 2011, and now it's 2018. Has my opinion on Innsbruck changed? I would say yes. I'm more mature now and if I went back, I would better appreciate what I was seeing. As I've gotten older, I've been less impressed by the massive buildings and more enthralled by the history that created them.

Read More