Instagramming Canada - Alberta

Instagramming Canada - Alberta September 21, 2015 · 5 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

Today in my Instagramming Canada series I am featuring the gorgeous province of Alberta! This time around I decided to use more architecture/city images instead of just nature just to see how it goes over. Alberta is known for rocky mountains, pristine lakes and eerie badlands, but just to try something new, I stuck in some city life too! Let me know what you think!

Without further adieu, I present to you: "Instagramming Canada - Alberta".

And a huge thank-you once again to José Luis Echeverría-Hayes for this awesome cover picture! Be sure to follow him on Instagram!

City Life

City LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity LifeCity Life

Banff National Park

Banff National ParkBanff National ParkBanff National ParkBanff National Park

Alberta Badlands

Alberta BadlandsAlberta BadlandsAlberta BadlandsAlberta Badlands

Rocky Mountains

Rocky MountainsRocky MountainsRocky MountainsRocky MountainsRocky MountainsRocky MountainsRocky MountainsRocky MountainsRocky MountainsRocky Mountains

Lakes and Rivers

Lakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and RiversLakes and Rivers

The Sky

The SkyThe SkyThe SkyThe SkyThe SkyThe SkyThe SkyThe Sky

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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