Innsbruck

Innsbruck December 16, 2014 · 4 min. readDisclaimer: This article may contain affiliate links.

We finally reached Innsbruck and got a small tour of it. We got to see the Golden Roof, along with many other wonders of the city.

I went into a few churches, and wanted to go into some of the museums but didn't feel I would have enough time to fully enjoy the museums and the actual city in only two hours, so instead I went to the Hofgarten (yes, the same name as the park in Munich. I don't name them, I'm sorry!).

Plaza Modern Art German Alps Street Street Street Arch Golden Roof

It was here that I got to watch a very interesting game of chess with two-feet high chess-pieces. I kind of felt like I was in a Harry Potter novel, only the pieces weren't killing each other.

Chess

Once we were done in Innsbruck, we headed to the Hotel Dollinger, which was a prime 500-years-old.

On the way to the hotel, Flip explained to us that with Muffin's "allowed" daily-driving limit and the time it would take us to get from Venice to Rome, if we wanted to get to Vatican City, we would have to leave at 6:45 AM. By doing that, we could get to Rome before 4 PM, manage to get in line for the Vatican, and possibly get a tour the day before we were supposed to. However, Flip said, there was no guarantee that we could get there that fast so the suffering of getting up at such an ungodly (pun intended) hour may have been in vain. Because the Vatican would be closed that day, this was our one and only shot to get there. We all agreed.

At the hotel in Innsbruck, we had a complimentary supper that included a creamy cheese and broccoli soup, a schnitzel with fried beans and a mashed potato, and a bowl of chocolate mousse for desert.

During supper, I learned that the girl who had missed the bus had gotten to Innsbruck safely. But she was alone. She didn't know her other friends had gone back to get her. We continued to eat, thinking about the friends that had left the tour, but before the mousse was eaten the door of the hotel opened and there they were! They had gotten back safely as well! As happy as I am for them, I sure hope the tour members start becoming more punctual and start catching the bus on time, especially in Venice. I don't want to miss out going to the Vatican!

After supper, I realized that out of the €850 I brought with me to Europe, I only had €470 left! I plan to be conservative for the rest of the trip and only buy things that I absolutely need to buy! (Note: I also put away one bill of each kind (€5, €10, €20, €50 and €100) for my collection back home. I never intended to spend those.)

We leave early tomorrow for Venice and tonight's big supper is getting to me. I'm going to go to bed, even though it's only 9 o'clock. Sorry today's entry is so boring. I really didn't get a chance to explore Innsbruck in the two hours we had. I promise tomorrow's entry -- about Venice -- will be much better!

Goodnight journal. Talk to you later.

PS: I just re-read what I wrote. It's hard to believe I've been in Europe for a week now. It seems like just yesterday I said goodbye to my parents and girlfriend. I wonder what they're doing now...

And I wonder where the next 10 days will take me!


And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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