How to be a Cowboy at the Medicine Hat Stampede

How to be a Cowboy at the Medicine Hat Stampede June 26, 2017 · 2 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

I want to start this off by saying that I am in no way, shape or form a cowboy. Being a cowboy takes decades of experience and requires a special bond with your horse. Cowboys are mysterious, romantic and the inspiration behind countless films throughout history, from The Night Rider to The Last Gunslinger. Every lady wants to be scooped up by a cowboy, and every man wants to ride like one.

A few weeks ago I was able to experience what it was like to be a cowboy at the Medicine Hat Stampede and Exhibition chuck wagon races. While many think of the Wild West as being a world away, you can find plenty of chuck wagon racing, barrel racing and horse competitions just a few hours west of Regina. Although I only spent one night at the races, I still met The Medicine Hat Rodeo Queen and Princess, could pet some horses, caught chuck wagon racing and made some new friends.

Horse houses in Medline Hat The Medicine Hat Stampede Queen and Princess The Medicine Hat Stampede Queen

One of the best things about the Medicine Hat Exhibition and Stampede is the welcoming atmosphere surrounding it. Upon arriving, I knew nothing about chuck wagons and horses, so I walked up to one of the 5,000 tireless volunteers and just asked. From there I hit the tracks and saw the races for myself – although I may have gotten a little too close.

Chuck wagon barrel racing in Medicine Hat Chuck wagon barrel racing in 
Medicine Hat Chuck wagon barrel racing in Medicine Hat

While the chuck wagon racing for this year is over, there is still plenty to see at the Medicine Hat Stampede and Exhibition, which runs from July 26th to 29th. For more information about what to see at the stampede, read my full article on FestivalSeekers.com

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How to be a Cowboy at the Medicine Hat Stampede How to be a Cowboy at the Medicine Hat Stampede

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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