Himeji

Himeji

December 10, 2014 · 6 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Today I woke up, and skipped the shower. I normally don't do that, but the lodge didn't have any warm water, except for the bath water from last night which, but that had long been drained.

I brushed up, did my hair and went down to the morning meditation service. During the service, each member of the group would ring an iron cauldron with a metal hammer. Then each person sprinkled some scented dust into the smoldering incense and asked Buddha for enlightenment.

After the service, we excited the lodge and walked a building down the street and participated in the fire ceremony. Unlike the calm chanting of the first service, this one involved an ever growing fire, with much louder chanting. But like the first service, we participated in this one as well. Each member of the group was given a piece of wood and we were to write one thing we wanted to improve on in our lives on it. We then handed it to the monks, and they burned them all together, sending our wishes into the universe.

Then, after a relaxing, body cleansing time at the lodge, we packed our bags and headed back to the bus, back down the mountain, through the two trains to Osaka and onto a third train to Himeji.

Back Down the Mountain Train Manners Shopping

Himeji is the city our tour guide is from, and is home to a UNESCO World Heritage Site. While the beautiful Osaka Castle was a reproduction built out of concrete after the original burned down, the castle in Himeji was still authentic wood.

Arriving first in Himeji, the group stopped for lunch. Nobody could agree on what to eat, so some members of the group went to the Hello Kitty restaurant, while others went to a very questionable submarine sandwich store. Steve, Alison, the tour guide and myself went to our own Japanese restaurant and tried saki (rice wine) for the first time. Was it ever good!

White Yourself Lunch Castle From Afar Himeji Castle

After lunch headed to an observatory and saw the castle from a distance. While up there it began to rain, and it rained the rest of the time we were in the city. We went towards Himeji Castle and climbed the many stairs to the top. Because the castle is authentic, it is closed for repairs and is set to open within the next few years. Currently only the outside is open to the public. However, there are still plenty of interesting things on the grounds!

One unique thing on the castle grounds was an old well with an iron grate on the top of it. Our tour guide told us that unlike other wells, it's bad luck to throw coins down this one. That's because, she said, there's a ghost in it. The story goes that long ago, a king wanted peace in his kingdom and invited his enemy over for a feast in hopes they could find a truce. While the wife was putting out plates for the king and his guests to eat, the leader of the enemy group took and stole one of the plates of food. Because of this, there weren't enough plates to feed all the guests and peace could not be made. The king was so embarrassed by his wife not being able to count that he hung her above the well and dropped her body into it. From then on, if you listen carefully in the well you can hear a woman's voice counting the number of plates, wondering where the 10th plate went.

Haunted Well Well Grate

That is, until word got out about this poor woman and the horrible mistake that occurred. The community had so much sympathy for her that they created a monument out of the well, and the counting was silenced forever.

Another equally interesting part of the castle was the decoration on the roof. Being built in a predominately Buddhist part of the world, in the 14th Century, Christianity wasn't very common in the area. However a distinct cross is embossed into the word, making many wonder it's purpose, especially when it is nowhere else on the castle.

Cross

Due to the rain, the heat, and general weariness, the group decided we had had enough of Himeji and just wanted to go to Hiroshima. So, we turned and left the castle, got back on the train and left to finally go to Hiroshima, the city I was most excited for!

Tonight we have a group supper planned so we can get to know each other better. I'm just excited to be in Hiroshima. I can't wait for tomorrow to explore this city!

Until tomorrow!


And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof-reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

Sharing this article helps the blog grow!

Get Your Complete List of What to See & Do in Regina!

Others are reading...

Himeji

Today I woke up, and skipped the shower. I normally don't do that, but the lodge didn't have any warm water, except for the bath water from last night which, but that had long been drained.

I brushed up, did my hair and went down to the morning meditation service. During the service, each member of the group would ring an iron cauldron with a metal hammer. Then each person sprinkled some scented dust into the smoldering incense and asked Buddha for enlightenment.

After the service, we excited the lodge and walked a building down the street and participated in the fire ceremony. Unlike the calm chanting of the first service, this one involved an ever growing fire, with much louder chanting. But like the first service, we participated in this one as well. Each member of the group was given a piece of wood and we were to write one thing we wanted to improve on in our lives on it. We then handed it to the monks, and they burned them all together, sending our wishes into the universe.

Read More

My First Hostel

When I was planning my trip to Poland and Ukraine I wanted to make everything as cheap as possible. I picked the cheapest flight, I went on the cheapest tours and I picked the cheapest places to sleep. I have read about other people staying in hostels, and that they can be much cheaper than hotels or even AirBnb, so I figured I would give it a try.

My first hostel was Kiev Central Station Hostel, located about a 6 minute drive or a 21 minute walk away from Central Railway Station. If you visit this hostel I would recommend either getting a ride from a bonafide taxi driver or just walking the distance.

One of the problems with Kyiv is the number of unofficial taxi drivers in the city. They hang around the airport and train stations like buzzards, charge ridiculous rates and, at least in my experience, speak zero English and deliberately get lost. I was warned about the taxi drivers at the airport but not the ones at the train station, so I took a chance and got burned. My driver took me as far south as the Central Bus Station and then back north again, which cost me 1,900 Hryvnia, or about $100, when it should have only been a 6 minute drive. For a less experienced traveler the experience would have been harrowing, especially when the taxi driver refused to respond to my requests to "Stop and let me out" after driving me around for over half an hour.

Read More

Easter Sunday in Kyiv

I had the pleasure of spending Easter Sunday in Kyiv on my last day in Europe. This was an unexpected surprise as I had celebrated Easter back in March and had forgotten Easter was a different day in Ukraine. For those who don't know, countries that follow the Eastern Orthodox Church still follow the old Julian calendar, at least when it comes to religious holidays. This moves religious holidays later into the year, such as Ukrainian Christmas which is January 7th.

This year Easter Sunday also happened to be on May Day, which is an annual celebration of spring and for honoring workers. Think of it like Labor Day but with pink ribbons, booming music, dancing, carousels and, this time, with giant hand-painted Easter eggs.

Being as it was both a national holiday and religious holiday, I gave up on my idea of visiting some of the museums and instead headed towards the churches and religion monuments. Everywhere I went there were crowds, but the whole city had a buzzing, celebratory atmosphere to it, so I didn't mind it that much.

Read More