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Fort Fright: Canada's Scariest Haunted House

Fort Fright: Canada's Scariest Haunted House October 12, 2018 · 7 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

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A few years ago, my girlfriend and I travelled to Milestone, Saskatchewan, a small town about an hour south of Regina. Out of all the buildings in Milestone, the largest is the historic Milestone Homestead, which is a former hotel that now operates as a bar. That year the community had come together and transformed the upper levels of the hotel into a spooky haunted house. Although it was a volunteer community project, it was fairly well done – at least from what I saw. Most of my time in the house was spent cowering behind Jessica with my eyes closed as she led the way. But, after we got out, and Jessica told me it was safe to open my eyes, I admitted it wasn't that scary at all.

Then I asked if we could go home and never do it again.

One year later I travelled to Kingston, Ontario to take in one of the scariest Halloween attractions in Canada. Not only is Kingston a lively and beautiful city, it's also plagued by the supernatural. From haunted bars to alleyways, hotels to houses and cemeteries to penitentiaries, there are plenty of creepy stories to go around.

But, the scariest place at all – and one of the most haunted in Canada – sits across St. Lawrence River from downtown Kingston. This massive, sprawling, building is called Fort Henry for eleven months of the year, but during October it takes on a different name: Fort Fright.

Sign Outside Fort Fright

The story of Fort Fright revolves around Sarah, a little girl who stumbled upon something supernatural in the woods. Initially she appears to be fine, but once the sun sets – and, coincidentally when you arrive – something goes horribly wrong. Sarah's hometown has become a corrupted version of itself, the surrounding woods are full of blood-curdling screams and the military has been stationed throughout the area. But, the scariest thing of all is that Sarah has gone missing, and it's up to you to find her.

Much like the haunted house in Milestone, Fort Fright is run by actors from the community. Some have bigger, narrative roles, while many others are just there to scare you. Some of these creatures hold weapons like chainsaws or axes, but they promise nobody will be touched or harmed during their visit here... or so they say...

Sign at Fort Fright

The entirety of Fort Fright is placed between the towering stone walls that surround Fort Henry. If you can look beyond the screaming maniacs and skeletons, you'll see the walls of a military base constructed to defend Canada from the invading United States during 1812. You will see thin windows for soldiers to shoot out of, cannons perched on ledges, and if you're lucky, maybe even some real ghosts.

Tower around Fort Fright Walls around Fort Fright

That's right. Not only is Fort Fright a terrifying carnival of ghouls and goblins, but this historic structure is also haunted by supernatural beings. These ghosts range from John Smith, who had his gun backfire and fell off the walls of the fort to his death, to Nils Von Schoultz, who was executed for plotting with the Americans. There are other ghosts too, such as the Wandering Ghost, who's legacy and origin are still a mystery.

Blood red walls in Fort Fright Blue Frankenstein Skeletons at Fort Fright

When you visit The Fort, you start in an area called The Upper Fort. This area is "safe" and is mostly just for people to stand in line, go to the washrooms and wonder what's screaming inside the fort. If you have time to explore you can visit some nearby shops to learn more about the fort and buy food. If you're feeling adventurous (and you probably are, if you've gotten this far) you can even go on a Coffin Ride or do an escape room with Improbable Escapes. Although I didn't go on the ride, I'm sure it's spook-tacular!

Upper Fort Shops near Fort Fright Inside nearby shops Coffin Rides

If you're thinking about taking your children to Fort Fright, I wouldn't recommend it. If the opening scene where Sarah goes missing doesn't scare them to death, running from clowns with chainsaws and mutated soldiers will probably give them nightmares. Also, to my understanding, once you enter the fort, there is no way out.

(Except for like, the main exit.)

Screaming Clown Screaming Clown

So, does this mean you can't take your kids? Of course not! Kingston is a college town so there are plenty of children throughout the community. The folks at Fort Henry know this and created The Otherworld – a magical world revealed as summer fades to fall. They have fun activities and games for both the young and the young-at-heart. The Otherworld is a new addition to the fort, and is the perfect alternative for children (and scaredy cats like me) who want to embrace autumn without the fear of being gutted by the undead.

(And, is that really too much to ask?)

Bloody man who would gut me Creepy clown

Tickets to Fort Fright are $16 per person, or $14 for military personnel (it is a military base after all) for groups of 20+. Tickets to the Otherworld are $16 per person, $6 per youth (5-12 years), free for children (4 and under), $14 for military and groups of 20+. If you want to experience both Fort Fright and the Otherworld, tickets are $25 per person, $23 for military and $22 per youth (age 5-12).

Once the skeletons go back to their graves and the snow flies, Fort Henry also hosts Lumina Borealis, a beautiful world of snow, ice and magic. I have never gone, but my friend Anna over at STRUCKBLOG has, so if you're interested, be sure to check out her article.

Have you ever been to Fort Henry, or its darker version Fort Fright? Would you be interested in going to the Otherworld? Tell me your thoughts in the comments below!

Don't forget to pin it!

Fort Fright: Canada's Scariest Haunted House Fort Fright: Canada's Scariest Haunted House

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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