Exploring Medicine Hat and Cypress Hills

Exploring Medicine Hat and Cypress Hills September 13, 2016 · 1 min. readWhile the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

A complete version of this article can be found on FestivalSeekers.com.

Known primarily for its abundant natural gas, Medicine Hat also takes pride in their locally grown food, flavorful coffee and booming art scene. To showcase this lesser-known side of the community, Medicine Hat annually hosts the Savour the Southeast festival. This festival offers a variety of different foods, flavours and treats for young and old alike. This year it takes place from September 25th to October 1st.

Medicine Hat Sweet Caporal in Medicine Hat Heartwood Cafe in Medicine Hat Inspire Cafe in Medicine Hat Station Coffee in Medicine Hat Station Coffee Signage in Medicine Hat

Just an hour outside of Medicine Hat is Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park, home to the highest point in Canada east of the Rocky Mountains. The park is full of over 400 camp sites, bike trails, hiking trails, lakes, rivers, hills and a thick wooded ecosystem found nowhere else in Canada. One of the few places in North America left untouched during the last Ice Age, some of the most dynamic and breathtaking views in Canada exist in this park. The park is open yearlong and offers a variety of winter activities, such as ice skating, sledding and cross-country skiing.

Cypress Hills Elkwater Beach Cypress Hills Horseshow Canyon Head of the Mountain in Cypress Hills Hills in Cypress Hills Morning Lake in Cypress Hills

If you're interested in learning more about Medicine Hat, the Savour the Southeast festival or Cypress Hills, read my full article on FestivalSeekers.com.

Don't forget to pin it!

Exploring Medicine Hat and Cypress Hills Exploring Medicine Hat and Cypress Hills

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

Get Your Complete List of What to See & Do in Regina!

You might also enjoy

150 Facts About Canada

Although the hot summer days of July are long behind us, 2017 is still Canada's 150th year. In honour of Canada's sesquicentennial birthday, I decided to put together a list of 150 things about Canada. This list talks about our quirkiness, our strengths, our weakness, and our legacy, for better and for worse. There are some sad facts, some odd facts and some facts that will probably make you open another tab to look into for yourself.

Hope you enjoy this list, and I hope you all had a great 2017!

1. Canada's two official languages are French and English, but only 20.6% of Canadians speak French.

Read More

Exploring Leader & The Great Southwest

When it comes to Saskatchewan, your next adventure can be around any corner. As you venture off the main highways, signage is scarce and directions such as "if you've passed the gate with the buffalo skulls, you've gone too far" are all too common. Communities grow smaller, people grow warmer and the list of things on your Saskatchewan Bucket List seems to only get longer.

My adventure to Leader started a few months ago when Christine over at Cruisin' Christine shared a list of Leader bus tours on Facebook. Some of the tours were in June, but one was in September. The September tour caught my eye because it was a two-day tour and I had to ask myself what we would do for two days in Leader. Leader has a three digit population, so I was perplexed on what the tour would comprise.

I was so perplexed that I decided contacted Leader Tourism and booked the tour to find out.

Read More

Where to Experience Alberta's Wild West Heritage

Just over a year ago I wrote an article about the glockenspiel that once stood in downtown Regina. I had fond memories of the glockenspiel as a child and was sad when they took it down to renovate the park. I was even more sad when they didn't put it back up, and I was angry when I discovered it was sitting in a junkyard (sorry, outdoor "storage facility") for the past ten years. That article got a lot of attention, from both the public, the city and the press. Today, efforts are being made to restore the bell back to its original location.

I'm telling you this because preserving heritage – may it be a 25-year-old bell, or a fourth century building – is important. Without heritage, we lose who we are. Often, the desire to move society forward steps over the heritage and causes it to get lost. As impressive as tall glass buildings might be, nothing is better than a smoky red brick structure.

 Saskatchewan is beginning to realize how important this is – and thankfully it's happening now and not in a few decades after everything is gone. But, our neighbours have been on the heritage preservation band train for several years now, especially in Alberta.

Read More