Exploring Medicine Hat and Cypress Hills

Exploring Medicine Hat and Cypress Hills September 13, 2016 · 1 min. readDisclaimer: While the thoughts and opinions are my own, this article was brought to you by a third party. Also, this article may contain affiliate links.

A complete version of this article can be found on FestivalSeekers.com.

Known primarily for its abundant natural gas, Medicine Hat also takes pride in their locally grown food, flavorful coffee and booming art scene. To showcase this lesser-known side of the community, Medicine Hat annually hosts the Savour the Southeast festival. This festival offers a variety of different foods, flavours and treats for young and old alike. This year it takes place from September 25th to October 1st.

Medicine Hat Sweet Caporal in Medicine Hat Heartwood Cafe in Medicine Hat Inspire Cafe in Medicine Hat Station Coffee in Medicine Hat Station Coffee Signage in Medicine Hat

Just an hour outside of Medicine Hat is Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park, home to the highest point in Canada east of the Rocky Mountains. The park is full of over 400 camp sites, bike trails, hiking trails, lakes, rivers, hills and a thick wooded ecosystem found nowhere else in Canada. One of the few places in North America left untouched during the last Ice Age, some of the most dynamic and breathtaking views in Canada exist in this park. The park is open yearlong and offers a variety of winter activities, such as ice skating, sledding and cross-country skiing.

Cypress Hills Elkwater Beach Cypress Hills Horseshow Canyon Head of the Mountain in Cypress Hills Hills in Cypress Hills Morning Lake in Cypress Hills

If you're interested in learning more about Medicine Hat, the Savour the Southeast festival or Cypress Hills, read my full article on FestivalSeekers.com.

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Exploring Medicine Hat and Cypress Hills Exploring Medicine Hat and Cypress Hills

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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