Starting My Asian Adventure

Starting My Asian Adventure December 1, 2014 · 3 min. read

The flight from Regina to Osaka was both incredibly boring, and incredibly interesting.

I sat with three different women from three different walks of life, on the three planes I took to get there. The first was a new mother, who was heading to Newfoundland for her sister's wedding. Her daughter was only a few months old, and didn't cry until we began to land in Toronto. The second woman was an American who was heading to meet up with her boyfriend in Kyoto during a confrence regarding heat transfer in skyscrapers and urban cities. The third was an old, tired woman, who has seen many things, and learned many more, but just longed to return home to Osaka to rest.

Besides the company, the flights themselves were very plain. I traveled from Regina to Toronto, Toronto to Tokyo and Tokyo to Osaka. We flew North from Toronto, up above Churchill, past Yellowknife, Whitehorse and Alaska. It was here I saw hundreds of miles of ice sheets covering the north Pacific Ocean -- although it was the middle of August! We then flew over the tail of Russia and down into Japan.

I have never flown across the International Dateline before, but I left Toronto at 10 AM Saturday morning, and flew in direct sunlight for 14 hours, only to land over 24 hours later at 2pm Sunday afternoon.

It was in the Tokyo airport I first witnessed Japanese culutre firsthand. TVs dotted the terminals, all showing fast, bright ads of anime, baseball, women and sketchy healthing promiting products. And the rumours are true: therereally is a Pokemon themed airplane!

My plane was delayed for a half hour due to a typhoon hitting Osaka, so I used the tablet (thanks mom!) to call home and talk to my girlfriend.

I arrived in Osaka and took the Airport Limousine (shuttle bus) to Namba Station. I then spent a very long 90 minutes in a hot, damp, vibrant city getting more and more lost among the skyscrapers and flashing lights. Only after I stopped at a 7-11 and asked for help did I get directions to my hotel from a man who spoke next to no English, but thankfully had a iPhone that could.

Upon my wet, tried, jet lagged arrival, I was informed I would be in a single room the first night I was in Osaka, and then a double room the next night when I joined my roommate. It didn't matter much to me, so I washed up, relaxed and went to bed. I was exhausted and my trip to Japan had only just begun!


And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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