50 Images That Showcase Regina

50 Images That Showcase Regina August 17, 2015 · 5 min. readDisclaimer: This article may contain affiliate links.

In anticipation of Regina's upcoming Instameet, I decided to showcase 50 images I've taken around the city over the course of the last couple years. You can find an additional collection of 30 images taken by other local photographers on Tourism Regina's most recent article.

I've broken this list down into 8 groups:

  • Architecture
  • Downtown
  • Street Art
  • The Legislature
  • The Sky
  • Wascana
  • Summer Fun
  • Miscellaneous

Did I miss something? Or do you have a question about one of the images? Let me know below!

Architecture

Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture Architecture

Downtown

Downtown Downtown Downtown Downtown Downtown

Street Art

Street Art Street Art Street Art Street Art Street Art Street Art Street Art Street Art

The Legislature

The Legislature The Legislature The Legislature The Legislature The Legislature The Legislature

The Sky

Sky Sky

Wascana

Wacana Wacana Wacana Wacana

Summer Fun

Summer Fun Summer Fun Summer Fun Summer Fun Summer Fun Summer Fun

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous Miscellaneous Miscellaneous Miscellaneous

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.


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