10 Things To See in NYC

10 Things To See in NYC February 12, 2015 · 9 min. readThis article may contain affiliate links.

I had three rushed days in NYC, but I fit in as much as I possibly could. I didn't get to see some of the most famous sights of the city, like the Statue of Liberty (thanks Sandy), but I did get to see a city unlike any other. Many people say to me "What's there to do in New York City?", and so I complied this list:

1. Broadway

Lights, cameras and action! New York City is full of artisans trying to make it big. At any given time there's over two dozens plays to go see in the city. In the need for a romantic play to get your mind off your broken heart? How about a mystery drama that will leave you thinking long after it's over? Or a toe-tapping play about rock and roll? Or a dramatization about war? New York has it all, and it's not that terribly expensive either!

2. 9/11 Museum and Memorial

I had the majority of a blog post dedicated to the Museum, but I unfortunately never made it to the memorial and the the memory pools that sit in the footprints of those two goliathan towers. Entering the 21st Century, and off the high of the 1990s, nobody could have been prepared for the the events of September 11th, 2001. It's a day forever stamped in our minds, and a day that plunged the United States into a decade long war, as well as reignited a religious struggle around the world. This is Ground Zero. This is where the towers fell, this is where the innocent died, this is where missing posters clung desperately on any flat surface, and this is where a city, divided by wealth, race, color and creed, was unified.

9/11 Museum

3. The High Line

You're thinking one of two things: either "You can't put that on your list. You didn't even go here!" or "What's the High Line?". While it's true I didn't get to the High Line while in New York, it was on the top of my list heading into that city. It's built on old abandoned coal tracks that used to feed into the buildings on Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood. These tracks have been converted into overhead parks, and offer an unique view of the city. With currently 1 and a half miles to walk, the High Line is quickly growing in popularity, for photographers, lovers and joggers alike.

4. Central Park

New York is famous for their skyline, and for the lack of skyline in the city's heart. Central Park is 2 and a half miles long and a half mile wide, and is full of more than enough attractions. If you aren't crossing bridges, skating on lakes, playing Frisbee, going fishing, going to the zoo, going on a horse drawn wagon, going to outdoor performances, playing chess or just enjoying the open air, Central Park offers many more activities for one to indulge in. It is a much needed green oasis in an otherwise concrete jungle.

Imagine Memorial

5. Character Restaurants and Pubs

New York fries, New York pizza, New York steak, New York cheesecake. Just thinking about the food in this city makes me hungry! Everything is better in New York, and the food lives up to this. I experienced everything from loud bars to small cramped burger joints to a Halloween themed restaurant, where people stand on tables and Dr. Frankenstein gives birth to his monster on a nightly basis. There's something for everybody in New York, even for those picky eaters!

6. Roosevelt Island

While I'm sure many islands around Manhattan belong on this list, I spent hours exploring a corner of Roosevelt Island and I didn't regret a single moment (except almost getting locked into the park with the abandoned smallpox hospital as my only company; that was scary). Although I only went to the southern part of the island, the man who first mentioned it to me, said the best place in New York is the northern part of the island. He said the architecture is unlike anything else in the world, and the streets can be navigated for hours and around every corner you will see something different. I never did get to that side of the island, so I'm going to believe him.

Roosevelt Island

7. The American Museum of Natural History

Do you like Ben Stiller? What about Owen Wilson? Robin Williams? These comedic geniuses are in the "Night of the Museum" trilogy, and it all starts here at the AMNH. Although not full of living dinosaurs, troublesome cavemen and gum craving Easter Island Heads, the museum is a sprawling structure with endless sights, covering the flora and fauna of the world to the makeup of the stars above our heads. To step inside its halls are like walking through history, frozen in time. It's an experience unlike any other!

8. Grand Central Station

This century old building is one of the main intersections of the subway system in New York, and has over 750,000 people walk through its doors each day. Imagine this, almost a million people every day. Lined with gold, green and stained glass windows, somebody unfamiliar might mistake the station to be a church or temple. With its many winding staircases and dozens of tunnels, this old building has stood the test of time and has become an icon of this great city.

Grand Central Station

9. The Empire State Building

Built at a record setting pace, with a floor going up each day, the Empire State Building towers over the skyline of New York. While no longer the tallest building in the city, it can boast this statistic with pride, especially since it's over 70 years old. While old, the building is also very modernized and is leading the world in superstructure energy efficiency. This building has even been the scene for the many King Kong movies, has a museum built inside, is guarded by a very aggressive bald eagle, and is known as one of the most recognizable buildings in the world (unless you're me, in which case I got it and the Chrysler Building mixed up).

The Empire State Building

10. The People

Perhaps cliché, but the people of NYC are a unique breed, and people watching in this city is a must. You'll see everyone from inspiring hip hop artists to actors, entrepreneurs to celebrities, paper boys to shop keepers, and burger flippers to seers. New York is a thriving, bustling city that has become one of the greatest places on earth, not because of the museums or parks, but because of the people, their determination and their strength. If you get a New Yorker alone, they will praise their city to no end. Of course there are problems in New York, but the people there, who live and fight for their city, love it to no end. It is this love that makes the city glow, and that makes New York such an incredible place to be.

New Yorkers

Don't forget to pin it!

10 Things To See in NYC

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

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