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Where to Eat, Play & Stay in Kingston

At over 175 years old, Kingston is a thriving city of entertainment, history, food and culture. Located on the crossroads of Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal, Kingston has aspects of each city woven into its cobblestone streets. Home to scores of national celebrities, towering limestone architecture and an impeccable food scene, Kingston is easily one of the top destinations you'll want to visit in Canada.  

While this article explores many aspects of Kingston, there's also a lot I wasn't able to cover. If you visit, don't be afraid to explore the city and make your own adventures too!

Downtown Kingston has everything a foodie could want, from global food chains to locally sourced pubs. It's impossible for me to list all the places you'll want to visit but, thanks to the folks over at Kingston Food Tour, I have several recommendations.

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Exploring Canada's Most Haunted City

As I stood in the courtyard of Fort Henry, I heard screams emanating from within. Fort Henry was constructed to protect the Kingston Royal Dockyard from the invading American forces during the War of 1812. The threat was so real that the capital of Canada – which was then Kingston – was moved to Quebec to protect it. The docks are all that stood between the United States and the St. Lawrence River and both countries were all too familiar with how easily it would turn the tides of battle.

As the screams from inside Fort Henry faded, I turned to the man beside me. He had come with his family. We got talking, trying to calm our nerves as bloodied clowns and undead mimes began wandering out from inside the fort.

"What brings you to Kingston?" he asked.

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Exploring the British Columbian Sunshine Coast

Several months ago Ford Canada approached me to review their 2017 Ford Explorer. I wanted to see how it handled grid roads, so I took it to a variety of ghost towns, abandoned houses and empty villages around Saskatchewan. I had a lot of fun with the article, and I guess Ford liked it too because a few months later they invited me to go out to the Sunshine Coast to try out a few other vehicles.

There were a few differences between this trip and the one I did around Saskatchewan. The first difference was that this was in the wooded forests of British Columbia and not the flat prairie of Saskatchewan. Instead of having the vehicle for a week, this would be a 2-day trip from Vancouver to the Painted Boat Resort and back again. Also, instead of traveling solo, I'd be travelling with several lifestyle and travel bloggers from across Western Canada – including the 2015 Saskatchewanderer Ashlyn George from The Lost Girl's Guide to Finding the World.

The vehicle we got on the way up to the resort was the same red Ford Explorer I tried out earlier this year. This worked out great for me as I was already very familiar with the vehicle and its quirks. On the way back Ashlyn drove a white 2017 Ford Edge.

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6 Saskatchewan Cemeteries to Visit This October

Cemeteries are a place of solace. All people, regardless of wealth, status, religion or creed are equals within a cemetery. It's a place of remembrance, respect and reconciliation. If you visit a cemetery, you are visiting the graves of lost loved ones. These may be children, pioneers, rebels or everyday people. Every grave has a story, and all are longing to be told.

Because of this, cemeteries are a library of knowledge. They hold the lessons of our past, and the wisdom of our future. As the leaves change and the days get shorter, cemeteries attract a much different crowd than that of just historians and family members. With autumn crisp in the air, cemeteries fill with thrill-seekers and paranormal believers. There is a fine line between what is and isn't acceptable within a cemetery and those who dabble into the affairs of the afterlife know this all too well. Few people go into cemeteries looking to disrespect the graves; instead, most are just hoping they can answer their own questions about life after death. 

Not all cemeteries are haunted, but each holds their own stories. Keep this in mind while you read this article. If you end up visiting any of these sites, remember to step softly, speak quietly and respect the surrounding graves. You might not be as alone as you think.

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10 Tips for Exploring Abandoned Places

When I visited Chernobyl last year I ran into a young woman from Wales that had been planning the trip for years. While chatting with her, she kept throwing around the word "urbexing". For those unfamiliar with the term, urbexing, or "urban exploring", is the act of going into abandoned locations and taking pictures inside them.

And apparently there's a whole subculture based around it.

For years I have had an interest in abandoned locations, even before I went looking for the old smallpox hospital in New York. As early as my teens I have been going into abandoned locations, and I got caught a few times. Because of this, my mom has plenty of stories about the phone calls she got following these misadventures, and I don't blame them for calling her.

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Exploring Leader & The Great Southwest

When it comes to Saskatchewan, your next adventure can be around any corner. As you venture off the main highways, signage is scarce and directions such as "if you've passed the gate with the buffalo skulls, you've gone too far" are all too common. Communities grow smaller, people grow warmer and the list of things on your Saskatchewan Bucket List seems to only get longer.

My adventure to Leader started a few months ago when Christine over at Cruisin' Christine shared a list of Leader bus tours on Facebook. Some of the tours were in June, but one was in September. The September tour caught my eye because it was a two-day tour and I had to ask myself what we would do for two days in Leader. Leader has a three digit population, so I was perplexed on what the tour would comprise.

I was so perplexed that I decided contacted Leader Tourism and booked the tour to find out.

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100 Facts About Winnipeg

I have been told my entire life that Winnipeg was just like Regina, but slightly larger. This gave the impression that there wasn't much to see in Winnipeg and that it, along with Regina, were more-or-less "fly over destinations". Since starting my blog, I've learned Regina is an absolutely incredible city so I imagined Winnipeg was the same. I then proceeded to contact Tourism Winnipeg and Travel Manitoba to find out the true Winnipeg, and ended up going on a multi-day excursion of their city.

Since a lot of my readers are from Regina and they almost all know somebody heading there for the Banjo Bowl in a couple of days, I thought I'd put this list together. There's a lot more to see there than just Investors Group Field, and the city's history is incredibly fascinating, so I hope you enjoy this list of 100 things about "Canada's Gateway to the West".

1. The city of Winnipeg is named after the nearby Lake Winnipeg.

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How to Spend 24 Hours in Medicine Hat

If you've ever passed through Medicine Hat, or you're spending a few days in the area, you've probably wondered what to do there. To most people outside the city, Medicine Hat might seem like a sleepy little prairie town in the Canadian Badlands; but for those who live in Hell's Basement, they'll tell you that this city is one of the most exciting places you can explore in all of Alberta.

I've gone to Medicine Hat three times in the past two years, and while I'm no expert on this thriving city, I know where the hidden gems are. If someone I know is passing through the area, I tell them they need to visit Medicine Hat. To help explain why, I put an article together for anyone else interested in visiting the Hat.

If you're spending 24 hours in Medicine Hat, you'll need somewhere to sleep. Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park is a little under an hour away and a great place to camp. Camping in Cypress gives you the choice to explore the park, the city, and everywhere in between.

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My Alberta Sturgeon Fishing Adventure

Last summer my family and I tried fishing up in Northern Saskatchewan. We had a great weekend, but we caught nothing. I wasn't too disappointed though, as I have never actually caught a fish. After 25 years of fishing and failing, I have officially given up on the sport.

That is until I was invited to visit Medicine Hat, Alberta and go sturgeon fishing on the South Saskatchewan River. I was hesitant, but I said yes. I really didn't want to spend eight hours out on the water just to come home empty-handed, but I figured to give it one more shot.

My guide for the day, Brent Thorimbert, picked me up at my hotel around 8:30 a.m. and drove us to a valley located just outside of Medicine Hat. We got out on the water about 9 a.m. and arrived at our fishing spot twenty minutes later. Brent explained that sturgeon fish are "bottom feeders" so they swim along the bottom of the riverbed and eat up bugs and small fish. Our fishing lines were weighted for this very reason. The bait should sit on the riverbed and would get sucked up by an unsuspecting sturgeon.

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Why The World Probably Won't End Tomorrow

If you haven't been following the news (or you chose to tune it out – in which case, I don't blame you) you may have missed the recent rhetoric between North Korea and the United States about possibly starting a nuclear war.

For those new to the story, after many years of research and development, North Korea has finally created an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that has the capability of striking the entire United States. They have also been able to scale their nuclear warheads down to fit inside their ICBMs. This potentially gives them the ability to nuke any location between Tokyo and New York City.

I have very little knowledge in geopolitics nor the ability to read the minds of Kim Jong-un or Donald Trump (thank God for that) but I do have an interest in atomic bombs and have been to the sites of various nuclear disasters. With the limited knowledge I have, I will explain why, even with the possibility of nuclear war on the horizon, the world probably won't end tomorrow.

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Exploring the 2017 Ford Explorer

I recently had the opportunity to test drive a 2017 Ford Explorer. I grew up learning how to drive a Ford Windstar so I figured an Explorer shouldn't be that much different. Sure, one is an SUV the other is a van, but a Ford's a Ford, right? Well, not exactly. From the moment I sat down, I knew it would be a very different experience from what I was used to.

There were things about the Explorer I liked, and some that I didn't, but it was overall a very nice vehicle. It drove smoothly, turned nicely and handled grid roads very well. I found the brakes to be a little touchy, but by the time the week ended, I mastered how to brake without awkwardly lurching myself forward.

Beyond the learning curve with the brakes, here are my positive and negative experiences with the 2017 Ford Explorer:

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Up, Up & Away at the Windscape Kite Festival

As this was my first time flying a kite, I'm proud to say I only crashed it about thirty times. Thankfully, my instructor said, the kite wasn't too expensive and was made for crash landings. After one particular sharp nose-dive, however, he came over to show me what I was doing wrong. After a few minor adjustments, I kicked the kite back into the air and managed to do my first loop.

The field we were in was empty that day. Within 24 hours, however, the field would be full of kite enthusiasts from across the world. Many of the kite flyers were from Canada and the United States, but some even came as far away as London, Germany and New Zealand. At only 13 years old, the SaskPower Windscape Kite Festival has become internationally renowned to kite flyers around the world.

When people think of kites, they might think of the classic diamond shaped kite of Charlie Brown. However, these days there are many different kinds of kites, and each with their own unique design and purpose.

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Your Great Escape to Cypress Hills

Were you planning a road trip to Banff, but plans bottomed out? Or were you looking to camp somewhere that isn't Sherwood Forest? Just a few hours west of Regina is a little-known place called Cypress Hills, and it's the great escape you didn't know you needed.

Although this is the second year I've visited Cypress Hills, I still loved every minute. Built from a geological phenomenon, Cypress Hills has one of the oldest and unique landscapes in Western Canada – and the highest point in Canada between the Rockies and the Newfoundland Peninsula.

As you can see from my piece on ZenSeekers.com, there's plenty to see and do in Cypress Hills such as biking to hiking to kayaking the beautiful Elkwater Lake. The nearby townsite also has an incredible museum, a restaurant and offers access to a variety of sporting and beach equipment. If you want to go on the water, on the beach, on the disc golf course or anywhere else, they have you covered.

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Learning to Chalk at the Sunshine Chalk Art Festival

Kristine Ens started with a simple black rectangle. When asked, she said the black helped brighter colours pop, and the base allowed for a smoother chalking surface. As I knew nothing about chalking, I nodded my head and let her work. In just over sixty minutes, Ens transformed that black box into a blue-eyed crow and surrounded it with an earthly green light.

I was very impressed, to say the least.

Ens has been chalking for three years and debuted in the first ever Medicine Hat Sunshine Chalk Art Festival in 2014. Since it began, 100 artists from across North America have made their annual pilgrimage to the festival which runs this year from August 11th – 13th.

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Regina's Night of Horror

Originally printed in The Morning Leader, July 1st, 1912

Cyclone drops to earth at south and of Smith and Lorne Street and clears houses, buildings and all obstacles to the north end – Early details probably exaggerated, but loss to city worst in Canadian history – Best buildings in city, Churches, Y.W.C.A, Y.M.C.A, Library, Phone Exchange, all destroyed – Hundreds of houses as flat as a board – Details.

"A Thousand Flags were flying where the Sky and City Meet"

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How to be a Cowboy at the Medicine Hat Stampede

I want to start this off by saying that I am in no way, shape or form a cowboy. Being a cowboy takes decades of experience and requires a special bond with your horse. Cowboys are mysterious, romantic and the inspiration behind countless films throughout history, from The Night Rider to The Last Gunslinger. Every lady wants to be scooped up by a cowboy, and every man wants to ride like one.

A few weeks ago I was able to experience what it was like to be a cowboy at the Medicine Hat Stampede and Exhibition chuck wagon races. While many think of the Wild West as being a world away, you can find plenty of chuck wagon racing, barrel racing and horse competitions just a few hours west of Regina. Although I only spent one night at the races, I still met The Medicine Hat Rodeo Queen and Princess, could pet some horses, caught chuck wagon racing and made some new friends.

One of the best things about the Medicine Hat Exhibition and Stampede is the welcoming atmosphere surrounding it. Upon arriving, I knew nothing about chuck wagons and horses, so I walked up to one of the 5,000 tireless volunteers and just asked. From there I hit the tracks and saw the races for myself – although I may have gotten a little too close.

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Experience Mosaic From Your Home

For about the third year in a row, I missed out on Regina's annual multicultural festival, Mosaic. To try and come to terms with the fact that I have failed to go for three years, I decided to throw my own little Mosaic with my girlfriend. While many people only shop at their favorite food stores, there are actually a variety of stores around Regina where you can buy unique, authentic cultural food. After all, just because Mosaic was over doesn't mean the food vanishes!

However, because I am a picky eater, and so is Jess, things didn't go exactly as planned.

Kenton: I had no idea what this was when I bought it, and I wouldn't ever buy it again. It tasted like disappointment. There wasn't much taste to it and it had some kind of strange pulp in it. I think it was coconut or a very pale fruit. Either way, I didn't care for this drink.

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15 Best Small Towns to Visit in Canada

As you know, I love Canada. I love the people, the culture, the history and everything that comes with it (except mosquitoes). Canada is an extremely diverse country that stretches from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean. It is also the second largest country in the world, featuring a plethora of different terrain.

Canada’s ten provinces and three territories are all completely different, with each having something different to offer. Lakes, mountains, valleys, waterfalls and countryside are just a few of the different things offered throughout the country. It also happens to have the longest coastline in the world.

There are many places to visit in Canada, from large vibrant cities to small mountain villages. It was hard narrow it down to just 15 places, so I got the help from Lisa over at The Crazy Tourist to help me out. Here are the 15 Best Small Towns to Visit In Canada. 

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Regina Spanish Flu Memorial Fund

While the newspapers screamed of war overseas, the real war was just beginning back home.

After four long years of grueling trench warfare, thousands of Canadian soldiers left Europe in 1918 to return home. As they disembarked from trains across the country, they unknowingly helped spread the Spanish Flu, the deadliest flu to ever occur in human history.

From 1918 to 1920, the Spanish Flu reached every corner of the globe. In the north it wiped out complete Inuit communities, and in the South Pacific whole countries were infected. Worldwide, the Spanish Flu killed between 20 and 100 million people. Canada was fortunate, but we still lost between 30,000 and 50,000 people, a number only slightly lower than that of the war.

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Why Doesn't Regina Have A “Main Street”?

More often than not, a city or town has a "Main Street" somewhere in it. Moose Jaw has one, Saskatoon has one, Calgary has one and Disneyland has one, but Regina doesn't. Many people probably have never thought about it, or just accept that Albert Street is our version of a main street, but still the question remains.

The answer lies back to the earliest days of Regina's history. Prior to the railway arriving in Regina in 1882, Regina was a splatter of houses north of the then much-less developed Wascana Creek.  The Canadian Pacific Railway laid the groundwork for their railway system, and marked their new station to be near Wascana Creek, which was far from the current capital of the Northwest Territories, Battleford. Since the train wouldn't be travelling that far north, Sir John A. MacDonald instructed the CPR to pick the location for the new capital. They chose the area that is now Regina.

Lieutenant-Governor Edgar Dewdney owned land near the proposed railway station and grew a community around it. Rapidly, the area around his property grew and had several stores, saloons and stables. This increased the wealth of the property and made it much more attractive for the CPR to use for their new station.

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One Year After Visiting Auschwitz

This week marks one year since I visited Auschwitz. Since then, I have told scores of people what I saw and how it impacted me. I found that the more people I shared my story with, the more people I meet who have had similar experiences. While we all saw different things, we all agreed that it was a trip that changed our lives.

The passage of time has a way of turning fact into fiction. Time seems to erode the legitimacy of history, either by inflating it to incomprehensible sizes or by dumbing it down so that it is impossible to relate to. This can be said for any part of our world's history, from minor political squabbles to major world changing events. As the years pass, people rely more and more on these stories to piece together the world that once was. Auschwitz, and the legitimacy of what happened here, is one of these victims.

My flight to Europe last year had been delayed. There was an issue on the plane coming from Warsaw to Toronto and the plane had to turn around. While I was trying to get my flights figured out, I started chatting with an older woman beside me. She was heading home to see her family in Ukraine for Orthodox Easter. As we talked about our upcoming trips, I told her my plans to visit Auschwitz. When I mentioned it, the lady waved her hand at me and told me not to expect too much. Over the years, she said, they had cleaned it up so much that it isn't even worth visiting. She told me that when she went there in the 1960s, the smell of burnt flesh clung to the walls of the buildings. But now, many years later, it has become so desensitised that there was nothing there worth seeing.

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