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13 Churches to Visit Before You Die

The recent fire at Notre Dame Cathedral got me thinking about how lucky I was to see such an incredible building – and how lucky we all are that it's still standing. In honour of its survival, and the Easter Season (assuming I can get this out prior to Easter Sunday), I thought I would put together a list of some of the most beautiful churches I've seen in my travels – and hopefully inspire you to see them too.

This article only lists churches I've been to, but there are countless others that people should visit too. Are there any other churches you think people should visit? How about temples or mosques? Leave your thoughts in the comments below!

St. Paul's Cathedral has been an iconic structure in London for over a millennium.  The current cathedral was constructed in 1697 after the previous (fourth) cathedral was lost to the Great Fire of London in 1666.

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5 Awesome Things to do in Malaga

Written by: Nicola Kennedy, Connect 2 Spain.

Steeped in history dating back to the Phoenicians, Malaga, Spain has always been a trading post for the countries of the Mediterranean Sea. Both the Greeks and Carthaginians settled the area, with the Romans finally creating the first municipality. Originally, Malaga thrived on the export of meat, salted fish, olive oil and raisins.

When the Roman Empire fell, the Visigoths arrived and ruled the city until the Moors established their Caliphate somewhere between 714AD and 716AD. They continued to use Malaga to not only export foodstuffs but also products from a burgeoning textile industry.

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Dog River After Corner Gas

Dog River, the fictional town of Corner Gas (2004 – 2009) is in Rouleau, Saskatchewan, about 40 minutes south of Regina. This town was once the home for over 100 episodes, a movie and now an animated series. During production, buildings were renamed, structures were built, and the streets were full of actors, comedians, politicians, filming equipment and tourists.

Corner Gas was popular in Canada, the United States and Europe, getting somewhat of a following like Anne of Green Gables has in Japan. Many European tourists came to Saskatchewan just to see the set, visit the locations from the show and experience small-town Saskatchewan life. The show was such a success that April 13 is even designated "Corner Gas Day" in Saskatchewan.

Once the show ended, many expected Dog River to become something like Avonlea in Prince Edward Island. It had the potential to be a thriving tourism centre, with live-action characters, running gags, scenes from the show, themed restaurants and Corner Gas merchandise.

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Moose Jaw's Medieval Château

It was fifty years ago that the Château Room was brought to Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, but only a few people have ever heard of it.

If you've never heard of the Château Room, you aren't alone. There's no conspiracy to keep it hidden; in fact, people visit it every day. The reason few people ever talk about it is because it's only accessible to military personnel.

So, as a civilian, it took me months to arrange a finally get a tour, and when I saw it… Well, why don't we start from the beginning.

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Saskatoon's Escape Manor is the Place to Beat

About five years ago I tried my first escape room, and I've been a fan ever since. Solving puzzles is something the web developer in me absolutely loves, and I've lost count of the amount of escape rooms I've attempted. Each one I've done has been fun, challenging and rewarding, although often very frustrating – all of which keeps me going back for more.

Many escape rooms offer board games, food and drinks before the "big escape" but Escape Manor's new Saskatoon location brings entertainment to a whole new level. Along with drinks and delicious food from partnerships with a select group of restaurants downtown. They also have custom board games, axe-throwing and bocce ball. Axe-throwing is something I've seen before (and, yes, thank you everybody who messaged me on social media – I know there are axe-throwing places in Regina...) but I've never seen it offered in an escape room setting. After I saw it, I thought it fit in perfectly. The gleaming axes and splintered wood go along perfect with the lanterns, chains and distant screams of madness from down the hall.

Saskatoon's Escape Manor also has a pillory as opposed to the Regina's Escape Manor's electric chair. I'm not sure which one I like more, since both are very cool, and very uncomfortable, but it does give the location an iconic touch.

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Top 10 ½ Tallest Statues in Saskatchewan – Second Edition

We all make mistakes, and Norway's crossing of Moose Jaw won't be forgotten anytime soon. With a lasting Moose Truce nowhere in sight, tensions between The Land of the Living Skies and the Land of the Midnight Sun have never been more antler-raising. Moose Jaw is holding a summit of Norwegian politicians the next few days to find a moos-lution and Justin and Greg have opted to flee the country all together (or maybe they went to a hockey game in Vegas… tough to tell what those two are up to sometimes!).

In the meantime, unlike Norway, I can admit when I made a mistake. A few weeks past I wrote "The Top 10 ½ Tallest Statues in Saskatchewan" following countless hours of research… and within 30 minutes of hitting "publish", I received a correction. As the days rolled by more and more corrections came in, I decided a whole new list would be needed.

When creating this revised list, I had to make one rule: vehicles on top of stilts or on tall platforms do not count as statues. I didn't think I would have to make parameters around what a "statue" is, but I had to enforce this one or else I would be calling farms all around the province. So, sorry, Craik's Motorcycle Tower! Your farm owner didn't call me back and now he ruined it for everybody!

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Everything You Wanted to Know About Taboo

Disclaimer: This article is about sex and sexuality. If you don't feel comfortable reading about that, please feel free to skip this article.

Taboo… The Naughty but Nice Sex Show is coming to Regina this weekend and with it comes many questions you probably didn't know how to ask. As somebody who has never gone to Taboo, I have done the down-and-dirty research to figure out what to expect during your first time.

Taboo runs from February 22nd – 24th at the Conexus Art Centre and is more of a trade show than an actual performance. The premise of the show is mostly education, not just entertainment. It's important to remember that adult entertainment is just that: entertainment. It is based around reality, but it has an element of fantasy attached to it too. Just like how movies and video games take everyday life and puts it in fantastical situations, adult entertainment does the same.

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The Magic Behind Cirque du Soleil's Crystal

Would you rather live in a perfect fantasy, or a flawed reality?

This is the question Crystal from Cirque du Soleil's latest performance must ask herself. Is the pain and suffering we go through on a daily basis worth only a few moments of joy? Or would it be better if there was only joy and no pain at all?

Crystal might be the 42nd Cirque du Soleil performance created, but it is the first to mix ice-skating with acrobatics. It isn't all skating and twirling, though, as twenty-two of the thirty-four performers are professional acrobats.  

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Review of TiVo - The World's Smartest PVR

Last month I wrote about Access Communications' new TiVo system. As the month has gone by, I've used it more and more and in return it's learned more about me. TiVo is known as "the world's smartest PVR" because of its artificial intelligence. You can vote content up or down to give TiVo a hint, or you can just watch the content you enjoy, and TiVo does all the algorithmic work in the background.

But what does that mean for user experience? Well, let's talk about it.

One of my lesser-known passions is urban planning. I love learning about how to house, transport and feed people more effectively. Not to get all hippy-dippy, but I believe we are at cross-roads between a dystopia like Kowloon Walled City or a utopia like Orbit City.

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8 Places to Visit in Montreal

Nestled between the impressive Mount Royal and the majestic St. Lawrence River is Montreal, a city known for its festivals, abstract art, history and mosaic of countless cultures. Montreal is the second largest city in Canada, with a population floating around four million people. While the city is a dynamic mix of Canada's two primary cultures – French and English – there are areas of the city that are culturally specific, such as Little Italy, Greektown and Chinatown. Known for its artistic and liberal mindedness, Montreal also boasts the largest community of homosexuals in North America in their very own "Gay Village".

Being nearly 375 years old, Montreal was pivotal to the creation of New France and Canada and at a time held control over every waterway from the St. Lawrence down to the Gulf of Mexico. Having such incredible influence over the western part of the New World, Montreal hosted the "Great Peace of Montreal" in 1701, which started sixteen years of peace between the French and over 40 different First Nation tribes in North America.

Since its early days, Montreal has been one of the most influential cities in Canada.  Montreal housed "internment camps" during World War I, became an ideal location for Americans looking for alcohol during Prohibition, and was the official residence of the Luxembourg royal family during World War II. Montreal held host to the incredible Expo 67, showcasing some of the most incredible architecture of that decade.  The seventies saw serious political reformation in Montreal, with many Americans arriving, fleeing the Vietnam Draft. The late seventies paralyzed the city as a terrorist organization, the Front de libération du Québec, detonated explosives throughout the city and kidnapped and killed political figures. These actions forced the Prime Minster to enact the "War Measures Act" and deploy the military into the city to apprehend the terrorists. The eighties and nineties saw two referendums in the province of Quebec to separate from Canada, with Montreal playing a major role in both decisions. The last referendum in 1995 ended with 51% percent of Quebecers wanting to remain part of Canada and 49% wanting to separate.

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Exploring Canada's Most Haunted City

As I stood in the courtyard of Fort Henry, I heard screams emanating from within. Fort Henry was constructed to protect the Kingston Royal Dockyard from the invading American forces during the War of 1812. The threat was so real that the capital of Canada – which was then Kingston – was moved to Quebec to protect it. The docks are all that stood between the United States and the St. Lawrence River and both countries were all too familiar with how easily it would turn the tides of battle.

As the screams from inside Fort Henry faded, I turned to the man beside me. He had come with his family. We got talking, trying to calm our nerves as bloodied clowns and undead mimes began wandering out from inside the fort.

"What brings you to Kingston?" he asked.

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Where to Experience Alberta's Wild West Heritage

Just over a year ago I wrote an article about the glockenspiel that once stood in downtown Regina. I had fond memories of the glockenspiel as a child and was sad when they took it down to renovate the park. I was even more sad when they didn't put it back up, and I was angry when I discovered it was sitting in a junkyard (sorry, outdoor "storage facility") for the past ten years. That article got a lot of attention, from both the public, the city and the press. Today, efforts are being made to restore the bell back to its original location.

I'm telling you this because preserving heritage – may it be a 25-year-old bell, or a fourth century building – is important. Without heritage, we lose who we are. Often, the desire to move society forward steps over the heritage and causes it to get lost. As impressive as tall glass buildings might be, nothing is better than a smoky red brick structure.

 Saskatchewan is beginning to realize how important this is – and thankfully it's happening now and not in a few decades after everything is gone. But, our neighbours have been on the heritage preservation band train for several years now, especially in Alberta.

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