My First Hostel

My First Hostel June 12, 2016 · 9 min. read

When I was planning my trip to Poland and Ukraine I wanted to make everything as cheap as possible. I picked the cheapest flight, I went on the cheapest tours and I picked the cheapest places to sleep. I have read about other people staying in hostels, and that they can be much cheaper than hotels or even AirBnb, so I figured I would give it a try.

My first hostel was Kiev Central Station Hostel, located about a 6 minute drive or a 21 minute walk away from Central Railway Station. If you visit this hostel I would recommend either getting a ride from a bonafide taxi driver or just walking the distance.

One of the problems with Kyiv is the number of unofficial taxi drivers in the city. They hang around the airport and train stations like buzzards, charge ridiculous rates and, at least in my experience, speak zero English and deliberately get lost. I was warned about the taxi drivers at the airport but not the ones at the train station, so I took a chance and got burned. My driver took me as far south as the Central Bus Station and then back north again, which cost me 1,900 Hryvnia, or about $100, when it should have only been a 6 minute drive. For a less experienced traveler the experience would have been harrowing, especially when the taxi driver refused to respond to my requests to "Stop and let me out" after driving me around for over half an hour.

Being as that was my first experience of Ukraine, I wasn't sure what to expect of the hostel, but I was pleasantly surprised.

Kiev Central Station Hostel is located on the fifth and sixth floor of an apartment building. The door to the building is open 24 hours a day, but the door to the hostel is locked with a passcode. One of the nights I arrived back at the hostel the door to the building was closed and I was stuck outside. Only after one of the residents of the apartment building came home was I able to get inside. I'm not sure what I would have done had they not come home, so if I ever stay at a hostel again, this is one of the first things I will ask about.

The host running the hostel was very sweet and spoke the best English out of anybody I met in Ukraine. She showed me the commons area, the kitchen area, and the rooms upstairs. They had six different rooms: a room with twelve beds, a room with six beds, a room with four beds, a women's only room, a private triple and a private double. There were also two bathrooms and three showers, but only one of the bathrooms and two of the showers had hot water. The toilet paper was also just brown paper towel, but I found that to be consistent throughout Ukraine as they used the same stuff at the hotel in Pripyat.

Commons Rooms Commons Rooms Commons Rooms

I chose the room with six beds, but of the three nights I spent there I only shared it with somebody for one night. The first night I fell asleep on my bed sometime around four in the afternoon and woke up to two people in my room, chatting with each other. When I got up one of them had already went to the washroom, and I got talking to the other one. His name is David and he's a German travel blogger, and he had just started traveling around the world. That day he had gone to Chernobyl so he told me what to expect while I was there. You can read about his experience, but he writes in German so if you aren't fluent, you might have some problem reading it.

Before coming to Ukraine, David was in Belarus, which is the last country in Europe to have a dictatorship, and Transnistria, a country that is only somewhat recognized by the international community (it's between the countries of Ukraine and Romania). Transnistria is was formed after the USSR collapsed, and still has ties to the former Soviet Union, with streets named Lenin Street and Karl Marx Street. Their flag also has the Soviet hammer and sickle on it. Transnistria also has their own currency, which is recognized nowhere else in the world. It looks fake, so it's something you're going to need to see to believe.  

Kiev Central Station also offers package discounts if you book a ChernobylWel.come tour through them, but not if you do them separately. If you're planning to stay at the hostel and go on the tour, you can save a few dollars by getting the package discount.

The nightly rate varies on what kind of room you get, but it ranges from €6 to €18 a night, which is about $8.50 to $26 CAD. My room was only €7 ($10) and I spent four nights there. Try to find a hotel that only charges $10 a night!

My Room Don't slam the door

The hostel prides itself as being a hostel for young people. They listen to music all the time, there are beer bottles throughout the commons area and children are not allowed to stay there. The website recommends if you are over 40, you might want to consider staying somewhere else, but I went there before the season really picked up and I had as much privacy as I would in a hotel.

Kiev Central Station Hostel also does things as a community, such as group BBQs, movie nights and tours to some locations such as local World War II Soviet bunkers, an AK-47 shooting range and an aviation museum. They also have affiliations with some tour companies, so you can get a complete tour of this incredible city if that's something you're interested in.

Kitchen

The hostel is also close to many restaurants, with one being right next door. I never had time to visit it but I did visit the confectionery right next to it, which offered a variety of fruits, meats, vegetables and drinks. There was also a currency exchange there, which came in handy after my taxi ride drained my wallet.

I didn't have much time in Kyiv so I didn't get to lounge around the commons and meet people, or take part in any of their tours, but it was nice to know the options were available. The only problems I had was getting to the hostel, and once somebody walked in on me in the bathroom while I was brushing my teeth. The doors to the rooms are wooden, but some of the doors to the bathrooms are plastic, so as a male I didn't have a problem with it, but a female might.

No hot water Sign on shower Bathroom

All in all, I really enjoyed staying at the hostel. I met some interesting people, learned some pretty cool things, had somewhere safe to sleep and saved some money. If I return to Kyiv I will probably stay here again.

Have you ever stayed in a hostel? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below!

Don't forget to pin it!

My First Hostel

And, as always, a big thank you to my sweetheart Jessica Nuttall for proof reading a countless number of my articles. I couldn't do any of this without you. I love you.

Like what you see?

Then sign up for more!

You might also enjoy

8 Places to Visit in Quebec City

I was recently asked if I preferred my time in Montreal or Quebec City more, and while Montreal is a gorgeous city, decorated with thousands of green copper spires, hosts incredible festivals, has some of the most fantastic food I have ever tasted, and is spotted with beautiful parks, there was just something about Quebec City that spoke to me. Being over four hundred years old, Quebec City is one of the last remaining "walled cities" in North America, and is the only one north of Mexico.  Quebec City was the location of some of the greatest conflicts in Canadian history, including the Siege of Quebec by the British.

Belonging to three very different countries (France, England, and Canada) in its four hundred year existence, Quebec City is a mixing pot of old traditions, new ideas, cobblestone streets and modern architecture. Since there is so much to see in Quebec City, I figured I would narrow it down to a couple and let you discover the rest! Here is "8 Places to Visit in Quebec City".

Old Quebec envelopes several locations listed below, and will be where you are spending the most of your time. This historic neighborhood was first developed during the early 1600s and has since expanded to become two separate areas: Upper Town (Haute-Ville) and Lower Town (Basse-Ville).

Read More

There's No Canada Like French Canada

This is the third of five articles about trips to take across Canada. I was inspired to do this series after I was disappointed by what Canadian tours G Adventures offered on their website.

Love poutine, Justin Trudeau and just about everything Québécois? G Adventures had the right idea including Montréal in two of their Canadian tours, but Montréal isn't the only noteworthy place to visit in Québec. Now, this tour doesn't give Québec the justice it deserves either, but hopefully it inspires you to take your time to explore the wonders it has to offer. Québec is a beautiful province with a long history, stretching back over four centuries, so this tour is dedicated to the incredible history and culture of French Canada.

Our fictional tour starts in Montréal. If you've read my Five Historic Canadian Cities article last week, you already know Montréal is one of Canada's most lively cities. Packed with some of Canada's most impressive scientific museums, Montréal is also home to an archeological and historical museum, Pointe-à-Callière. Inside one of the most unique buildings in Old Montréal, this museum ventures deep into the history of the city and explores its foundation, its struggles and its changes. With 375 years of history, to uncover this museum starts off with the discovery of Hochelaga and showcases various sections of the original sewer system. The museum also has several illustrations showing the plagues and fires that once decimated the early city. The museum also has an interactive section about the pirates that once terrorized the St. Lawrence River. This museum is one of my absolute favorites, so if you love museums as much as I, you'll want to check it out.

Read More

5 Weekend Destinations In Saskatchewan

The past few weeks have been really busy for me, with a lot more time at the office and a lot less time travelling. Thankfully, the weekend is just around the corner and with it comes the possibility of a two day vacation. Having traveled to Lac La Ronge earlier this month, I've been thinking more and more about these short trips and how rejuvenating they can be.

Unfortunately, I haven't done as much travelling around Saskatchewan as I'd like, so I wasn't sure what the best places to visit were. There were of course the obvious choices such as Regina, Saskatoon and Moose Jaw, but I wanted someplace remote, yet somewhat close. For this project I approached some of my fellow travel bloggers and I got some ideas of what to go do and see for a weekend. I went through their ideas and came up with this short list of 5 weekend destinations in Saskatchewan.

Thanks to TELUS' incredible network, sections of Saskatchewan that once never had coverage can now be fully explored while still being connected to your mobile device. No matter where you travel in Saskatchewan -- or even in Canada -- this summer, you can rely on TELUS' mobile network to keep you connected.

Read More